5 Quick Questions about Raccoon Tycoon with Glenn Drover

5 Quick Questions about Raccoon Tycoon with Glenn Drover

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s an interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR. Let’s see how Glenn Drover, the legendary designer of hot new game Raccoon Tycoon (published by Forbidden Games), shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Raccoon Tycoon?

Glenn: Raccoon Tycoon is an easy to learn (and teach) game of commodity speculation, auctions, set-collection, and tableau building set in the gilded age in Astoria (a land of anthropomorphic animals). The artwork by Annie Stegg is insanely beautiful, and together with the shallow learning curve makes the game appealing to a wide demographic: families and non-gamers, while the multiple strategies and challenging decisions will make it appealing to core gamers.

BGBMaking games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Glenn: My wife finally played Catan with friends last year and hated it. This shocked me, so I asked her why. She told me that she was frustrated by having to wait for her turn, and then often not being able to do much or anything if her numbers didn’t come up. That night I decided to design a game that would appeal to Catan fans (Gateway à Gamers) with commodities, low luck, and where you could ALWAYS do something interesting on your turn. Raccoon Tycoon was born.

BGBThere are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Glenn: The game that you will play with non-gamers or casual gamers who you want to bring into the gaming world…or anyone who likes Catan or Ticket to Ride and is ready for the next great Gateway Game.

Raccoon Tycoon
Editor’s Note: I have never heard of this publication.

BGBThis is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Glenn: It used to have a really annoying mechanic where you had to draw a bunch of cubes every turn to change the price and supply in the market. Dan Vujovic suggested that a card mechanic would be cleaner. After months of resistance (I really like the perfect supply/demand impact of the cube draw), I relented and created the Price/Production cards that drive the market now. They not only worked better, they gave the player another interesting (and sometimes agonizing) decision.

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Raccoon Tycoon! Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Glenn: Time: 60 – 90 minutes, Players: 2 – 5, Learning Curve: 2/5, Strategy: 4/5

Joke

What’s the difference between a dead Raccoon in the road and a run over copy of Monopoly?
A: There are skid marks in front of the Raccoon.

The game is now LIVE on Kickstarter

Good Men: A tribute to my father, Robert Leo Burgess

Good Men: A tribute to my father, Robert Leo Burgess

2018 got off to a rough start for me, as I spent a lot of January with family concerns. My father’s health failed and my mother is also dealing with issues. At the end of the month, I lost my father to long illness and I wrote this note about him on Facebook. I heard from a few people that they had shared it because my note on Facebook about the wonderful father I was honored to have seems like it inspired some good discussions and consideration about what it means to be a father. I’ve slightly edited it to remove some personal points that are not as relevant to the casual reader, but kept what I think was the heart of the piece.


January 30, 2018 – Late Sunday night, as I was watching a Netflix film about funny people and trying not to think about what was imminent, my father passed away after a brief time in hospice.

I have been uncharacteristically silent on social media because I am still processing the loss, which I can only do with words. There was further delay from a paper cut on my right index finger that I gained while filling out the paperwork to release his body for cremation just moments after I arrived at the hospice. I was first to arrive, had driven over in a haze and, at that moment, appreciated the sharp pain of the cut popping my consciousness back into place before I went in to see my dad one last time.

As I sit here in the dark of morning a day later, I am thinking one could say that my father was not a great man. Great men change the whole world in some way. Maybe it’s how business runs in a particular space, how we think about something important or even how we view change and evolution in a broader sense. What I do know about great men, as I’ve known a few, is that they make sacrifices for their greatness and for whatever cause that matters more than anything to them.

That wasn’t my dad. He was a good man.

Good men attend to everything across their lives at some level from acceptably to amazingly. They love their families, they work hard to get educated and then at a job to make sure, as they say, the ends meet. They are far from perfect but their desire to make sure everything across life happens well enough is admirable because they don’t believe in kids getting ignored for a job or constantly needing to be off in their man cave or out with buddies to pretend they don’t have family obligations in real life. Good men make room in their lives for their spouse and their children; the best of them give their family an outsized space.

The good men find balance. They shift gears when the family is formed. They might even seem a bit boring, at times. But, good and boring pays the bills. Good and boring shows up to their children’s recital. And good and boring leaves a legacy of loving memories and kids who adore them.

And, if you knew him at all, how could you not adore my dad? If you found a way, well, too bad for you. The rest of us were crazy about him.

Robert Leo Burgess was born on December 7, 1933, a while before that date was Pearl Harbor Day. The youngest of nine kids, he was shorter than all of the men in the family, which he often attributed to there ‘being nothing left’ when he finally came around. As the baby of the family, he was very loved and received a lot of attention. I feel confident that my father’s passionate commitment to our immediate family came from the constant support and love he got from his own mother and siblings, who might have been compensating for my grandfather being less than affectionate.

Dad was a bruiser and a tough guy all his life, but it manifested much differently later because he was gregarious almost to a fault. He could walk into a room with ten people and they were all his friends before he left it. Now, if you’re reading this, you probably know what it is like to be in a conversation with a Burgess. We talk and talk…sometimes you’d think we just like to hear our own voices (yes, they do sound good), but, really, we like telling stories.

In my dad’s generation, I often say the nuance in the stories and their purpose changes from sibling to sibling. My dad focused on the funny. He was far more likely to tell you a joke than a story. He was always fond of them but, after his stroke a decade ago, he became a veritable sit-down comedian. Everyone nearby was subjected to them and he left most of the many, many hospitals since his stroke with nurses sorry to see him go because he kept them laughing and always had a positive attitude. It could be a problem, though. When we’d tell him, “Dad, that waiter kind of needs to actually go put in the order,” he’d say, “It’s good for his health! I’m helping him!” No one was safe from his laugh therapy. I tried to give him new joke books every year but he stuck to the old faithfuls most of the time, including one-liners that would make Henny Youngman proud. As he became increasingly difficult to understand, it wasn’t hard to listen for the moment when he was going to laugh so you could laugh along with him at the right moment.

My father’s major passion in middle life to late life was reading. He took a speed reading course as a younger man and never lost it. When I was young, he took the bus to his office in East L.A., reading on the way there and back, plus he’d hit the pages during two tea breaks in the morning and afternoon and also at lunch. With that, he’d polish off close to two books a day. Of course, these were not studies on neuroscience or impenetrable postmodern novels; his interest was in mysteries and biographies of pop culture icons. He also had zero interest in retaining those yellowed paperbacks like talismans of accomplishment – he was constantly moving the books he’d read out for the next batch and watching like an addict for the next library sale where books were a buck a bag. In the last year, I was his dealer, hitting all the library sales and used bookshops to round up enough books to keep him reading all day, every day. My Saturday morning ritual was to show him the books I’d gathered all morning in hopes that I’d get approval for more than 50% of them. I succeeded most of the time.

Among the lighter reading, he’d find time for some of his favorite literary authors and I’d bring them over for a re-read. He had an affinity for authors who seemed to write the same book over and over again – Bukowski, Kerouac (on whom we disagreed), Fitzgerald (on whom we agreed), and Thomas Wolfe – his favorite writer. Something about Wolfe appealed to my dad – maybe the overwhelming emotion in his prose, the questing real-life narratives, or the grandiose diction. Whatever the case, he delighted in Wolfe’s work and life, often repeating biographical details like Wolfe’s tendency to write while leaning against his refrigerator or how he died from TB after contracting it from a hobo he met when he jumped a train. A complete collection of Wolfe’s work is among the slim library my dad retained on his small shelves.

His other passion was the silver screen. He was an avid film lover and moviegoer. But he didn’t travel with film into the modern day. His love for moving pictures remained largely in the black-and-white. As a young man, he worked at a movie theater for some time and all those free movies might have developed the habit. He did love to talk about films and one of our rituals for ages was watching Siskel and Ebert in their various formats on Sunday evenings before dinner. Yet, huge swathes of film, and even music were unavailable to him because he didn’t like the performer. All those biographies gave him details about actors, singers, and directors that were lousy to their families, their wives, or their colleagues. After that, he wouldn’t want to see anything with that person involved. I used to tease him about it – “Who cares if Robert De Niro is a jerk? Raging Bull is amazing.” He wouldn’t budge. Even this last Christmas, he reminded me when he heard a Bing Crosby song on our playlist that the performer was ‘a terrible parent.’ Now, I realize this was just an extension of my dad’s goodness; he didn’t want even exceptional art if it came from bad people.

My dad’s passion for the written word on the page and on the screen inspired my own. Despite my love of technology, I followed in his footsteps and studied literature in college. It worked out in the career I have chosen that blends our great loves. While I tell stories in software more often than I do in prose, there is still the structure and the passion to tell a tale that will enlighten, inspire and enrich the life of the reader, here a user. That came from my dad.

The games came from him, too. Dad was a poker and cribbage player but mostly because of the society of play. Winning meant nothing to him; he craved card play for the chance to interact. When I was young, the monthly poker games my Dad attended was a highlight. Most of the attendees were family, my uncles and older cousins made up the bulk of the group, but some old friends of theirs often rounded out the table of freewheeling dealer’s choice. Yes, it was nice to play but it was mostly about the conversation. Dad played so he could tell and hear jokes, share family news, and spend time with his favorite buddies. The poker nights were an excuse to stay connected with family and friends. I see that in my own board gameplay now, that desire to hold on to my closest friends through regular sessions, keeping the creation of precious hours in regular production.

My cribbage memories are mostly of just the two of us playing. He was an incredibly generous player. He’d call ‘muggins’ if you missed points in your hand, but he’d give them to you anyway. This was a reaction to his own father who was notorious in the family for cheating. He’d back-peg and do all kinds of questionable stuff against even his own kids. I’m glad that what my dad learned from that is what NOT to do. I’ve learned well from his example here.

As we have lost so many of my dad’s generation in the family recently, I’ve often thought about how to distinguish the Burgessness of them all. Yes, that’s a word; it needed invention for that last sentence to work. My generation, of which I’m the youngest, know what I mean. There was a powerful sense of Burgessness throughout them all.

What was my dad best at? Sure, there was the humor I spoke about. Yet, there was also a sense of compassion in him that I admired. As the youngest of his family’s generation, I would like to think he was among the most modern with regard to accepting others. If the decades of time in social work taught him one thing, it was compassion for his fellow man and woman. My dad spent a lot of time with people who were facing the worst days of their lives. He had a positive spirit in his heart at all times so he could console, he could inspire, he could help. While neither of us had much use for organized religion, our Catholic upbringing did instill a concern for the weakest in society, which we both extended to tolerance. He believed in the common good and that America was about all people, not just your own tribe. Dad championed the underdog and the weak like all heroes do. I will always admire him for his lack of cynicism and interest in seeing real action over words.

As a father, he was devoted to making sure we had what we needed. He made sacrifices, neglected to have much of any kind of a mid-life crisis – other than briefly listening to more Willie Nelson and Jim Croce than was generally advisable – and was true to our family and his wife. He was not handy around the house; Dad couldn’t change a light bulb. He was certainly no gourmet unless you consider a predilection for peanut butter and butter sandwiches, or Velveeta on graham crackers to be avant-garde in some way. He blew the Santa thing by walking into the house with an Atari 2600 under his arm from Clarks Drugs when I was a kid, but at least he brought the thing home, despite an irrational fear of anything electronic. He didn’t drink, except for the occasional pina colada (of which I’d get a sip!), and never smoked because his own father had shortened his life with both of those vices. His kids are the same way as a result.

Dad would always drive you where you needed to go, pick you up when you were in a bind, help, throw money at a problem (what is money for, anyway?), and console you when things went wrong. Dad was always okay with your mistakes; he was there to help clean them up and get you back on track. Dad was exceptionally good at being supportive and not throwing something in your face when you failed because you didn’t listen to his advice. He never said ‘I told you so,” never wanted to “teach people a lesson”, never wanted to make it hard on someone when they were already down. He was a supervisor at work and I can remember how hard the employees fought to be on his team – they told me so without asking. They knew he was the kind of leader who worked with you and offered guidance, not the kind who obsessed on hierarchy. The masses at his retirement party years later spoke volumes; he was much-loved at work, too.

Dad never made us feel like we were not good enough, that his love had any strings, that his judgment was against us. He was generous with compliments, acknowledged the good things, and praised like no other. Even in the last days before he became largely incoherent, he was telling us we ‘were the best’, expressed his love for us, and talked about how wonderful his grandchildren were. He spoke this way to everyone. He saw value in spreading positivity as often as possible, and in every situation.

Dad stopped walking about a year ago and for most of that time, he was at a board-and-care facility just across the street from my house. I loved the fact that I could look out my front window when I got home from work and see if his light was on to know if I could visit. It was easy to slip over there; the people who ran the place knew me well enough that I didn’t need to sign in. Dad would always be happy to see me. His mind would start clouded and he’d need to get some ideas out of the way; he’d often start mid-sentence as if I’d walked in on a conversation he was already having, talking about the book he’d just read or some detail that was important enough that he returned to it with some frequency (like his brief time on the set of “Touch of Evil” or when he and I met Harlan Ellison, who tried to convince him to kick me out of the house when I commented on Ellison’s car commercials of the time). But once you got past those anecdotes that were sitting on top of his consciousness, you could really talk to him. We had so many good chats about what was going on these days (of course he hates Trump – he’s an awful person) and how the kids are doing (he would cry from joy when we discussed my son’s Eagle Scout rank or my daughter’s exceptional talent as a singer). He hasn’t been at full cognitive power for more than a decade, but he didn’t lose his sense of justice nor his deep love of his family.

I’ve had twenty years to get used to the fact that I would lose my dad one day. In 1998, he had bypass surgery and, in short order, was diagnosed with prostate cancer. I thought I was going to lose him then. But he recovered. Then, the stroke hit in 2007 and again, I thought I was going to lose my dad. But he recovered. Seizures, minor strokes (perhaps) and an endless number of falls occurred in the next decade. We went to the ER a lot, each time prepared for the worst. But he recovered somehow again and again. We have had so many extra years to consider that we might lose him, which gave me a ton of time to express my appreciation for him. He met all of that with love. After his stroke, he often couldn’t contain his emotions so I would do my best to express my love with a laugh so he could laugh, too. It worked most of the time.

For me, this was all ‘bonus time.’ I am so grateful for every day of it.

Last Wednesday was the last day when Dad and I communicated directly. After the doctor called me and let me know he recommended that we let Dad enter hospice, I drove out to the hospital and woke him up. He recognized me by my voice, heard me tell him how much I loved him and responded with the same. He could no longer intake water so I used swabs to soothe him a bit, as I had done with my Uncle Bill just six months before. I was reminded to take that moment to express what I needed to, as I had with Uncle Bill. With Dad, though, I remembered how often I’d repeated what I wanted to say. He knew how much I loved him and appreciated him. He loved how I told him that his brother Bill had added to my personality as much as he had. He loved that I acknowledged my Uncle Ed as a similar inspiration in my life. He thought the world of them both and told me I was smart to not just learn from him because he’d done the same and learned so much from his brothers and sisters, even more than from his own father. We understood each other well. I didn’t have to say it all again. I just had to hug him and hold his hand and tell him I loved him.

So, I’m going to revise my earlier statement. My dad was a great man to the people in his life, to the people he helped and befriended – who are legion – and the people who he loved so much. He neglected being great for the world so he could be greater for all of us, those who knew him and, inevitably, loved him.

PRESS RELEASE: Renegade Games Introduces Fireworks!

PRESS RELEASE: Renegade Games Introduces Fireworks!
San Diego, CA (June 14th, 2018) — Renegade Game Studios™ is excited to announce the next explosive addition to their catalog — Fireworks! This will be the fifth dexterity game in the Renegade catalog by Aza-Chen, designer of other adorably fun games such as Kitty PawDoggy Go!Shiba Inu House, and Circus Puppy. You can find this title on game shelves in beginning September 2018. Pre-order from the Friendly Local Game Store now or through the Renegade Store for Essen Pick-up!

A group of cats has been training very hard to master their profession — shooting off the biggest and best fireworks in the world! Although they are still rookies, they hope to become experts someday. Which cat can put on the most explosive fireworks display?

The goal is to collect Fireworks Tiles and arrange them on your City Board to create stunning displays. On your turn, you launch the Fireworks Die out of the barrel and into the box. You then take some face-up Fireworks Tiles from the box and place them on your city board. The game end is triggered when a player fills up their entire City Board. Whoever has the most valuable fireworks display wins!

Features:

  • Launch the Fireworks Die into the City
  • Create the most beautiful night sky
  • Action cards add silly rules for even more fun
  • Play with Advanced or Speed Variants
  • Purr-fect for 2-4 kitties ages 6+ to play in about 20 minutes

Quick Facts
MSRP: $25.00
SKU: RGS0823
North America Release Date: September
Game Type: Dexterity

READ THE RULEBOOK!

About Renegade Game Studios:
Renegade Game Studios is a premier developer and publisher of original award winning board games, including Overlight, Clank!: A Deck-Building Adventure, Lanterns: The Harvest Festival, and The Fox in the Forest. Our mission is to publish games that are fun, challenging, and unique.  We believe that gaming is for everybody and that everybody is a gamer; you just have to find the right game!

Find out more at www.renegadegames.com

PRESS RELEASE: Introducing Forsaken Forest: A Social Deduction Horror Survival Game

PRESS RELEASE: Introducing Forsaken Forest: A Social Deduction Horror Survival Game

June 12th, 2018 – NYC, New York – Forsaken Games has announced its first official game, “Forsaken Forest,” for tabletop play. The game is now live on Kickstarter.

Forsaken Forest: A Social Deduction Horror Survival Game

The newest innovation within the social deduction genre, Forsaken Forest represents a tidy marriage between traditional hidden-role games and more complex strategy games, such as Magic: the Gathering.

Forsaken Forest conjures utter paranoia and terror, mixed with Machiavellian mischief. A group of travelers has awoken an Ancient Evil. Little do they know, some of those who travel among them have already been Corrupted.

Forsaken Forest is a social deduction card game set within a mysterious forest, inexplicably warped by dark magic. In order to win, you must navigate to your team’s veiled Destination before the opposing team navigates to theirs, or eliminate everyone who stands in your way. Along the way, you’ll need to manage your resources wisely, gain the trust of your fellow travelers, and fend off the evils of the Night.

Just remember that not all who Wander are truly lost.

Uncover hidden information, and put the puzzle together, one piece at a time. Lie, bluff and double-cross. Execute complex strategies. Navigate, Eliminate. Survive.  

A New Take On Social Deduction Games

Forsaken Forest breathes new life into the social deduction genre. Players are faced with skill testing decisions from beginning to end. Each game is wildly different from the last. Each time you’ll face new obstacles, utilize new resources, and wake up with a new identity, thanks to the diverse assortment of unique cards in each deck and the modular nature of the game.

Forsaken Forest has more depth than any other social deduction game, with more evidence, more ways to bluff, and more strategic decisions to make than any other game in the genre.

Forsaken Games is an independent developer and publisher of tabletop games. Founded in 2016, this is their first official title. Visit them online at www.forsakenforest.com.

You can find the Forsaken Forest Kickstarter here.

PRESS RELEASE: Capital Gains Studio Announces New Cryptocurrency Board Game

PRESS RELEASE: Capital Gains Studio Announces New Cryptocurrency Board Game

Singapore, 7th June 2018 – Capital Gains Studio is proud to announce an exciting new table-top game titled Cryptocurrency. As the name implies, the game is built upon the emerging alternative digital currency that has skyrocketed in popularity over the recent years, sending investors on a frenzied ride with its erratic ups and downs, turning many early adopters into overnight millionaires.

“The game’s objective is to bring to light the thrills and also perils of cryptocurrency as an investment. While many people are enticed by the prospects of instantaneous wealth by cryptocurrency, many fail to see the potential pitfalls of this new investment vehicle as they lack the foundational education needed to thrive. As a result, many opportunists are also seizing this opportunity and creating scams to take advantage of unsuspecting victims. According to Bitcoin.com, there is an average of USD 9 million lost a day in cryptocurrency scams, highlighting the urgent need for more educational efforts on this rising digital currency.” said Xeo Lye, co-founder of CGS and producer for Cryptocurrency.

Cryptocurrency

Slated for launch on the popular crowdfunding platform Kickstarter on Quarter 3 of 2018, Cryptocurrency hopes to raise sufficient fund to cover their design and manufacturing expenses. CGS also plans to give away 300 copies of a basic version of the game during Kickstarter and is given out base on a first come first serve basis.

Cryptocurrency will be the studio’s fifth table-top game featuring a financial theme. “True to the heart of Capital Gains Studio, this game is a testament of our mission to empower the man on the street with the financial knowledge necessary to make informed investment decisions while learning how to preserve and grow their wealth in a fun and safe setting. Cryptocurrency is a reflection of the current times and our team has been meticulous in ensuring that the game is an accurate portrayal of the complex world of cryptocurrencies, made simple through our gameplay experience. The game will enable players to learn the mechanics behind cryptocurrency and avoid obvious pitfalls and rampant scams that are prevalent in current times,” Lye added.

Game Theme and Mechanism

Sharing the same fictional universe as Wongamania: Banana Economy and Debtzilla, Cryptocurrency will take place in the nation of Banana Republic, where the stories of overnight millionaires who have mastered the art of mining and trading in cryptocurrencies has spurred the fictional citizens into a mad rush to make quick money from this new frontier of digital currencies. The theme features a roster of futuristic cyborgs and experts wielding high tech gadgets inspired by the Cyberpunk theme.

Players will take on the role of a cryptocurrency prospector, leading a team of technological experts who will help you to evaluate, trade and mine various cryptocurrencies. However, some of the cryptocurrencies are scams, designed to rob the unwary investors of their money and it is up to the player to sift through many layers of information to avoid being tricked. Players must make strategic decisions in hiring technological experts through a drafting mechanism, solve cryptocurrency mining algorithms through a push your luck mini-game and manipulate the information network using hidden and revealed information, all while engaging in tactical coin trading and getting rid of the questionable coins before the game ends. The player who manages to accumulate the most wealth wins.

Cryptocurrency

Who Is This Game For

Cryptocurrency is made for 2 to 4 players, suitable for players age 14 years and above. It takes approximately 60 minutes to complete the game. Cryptocurrency is the 5th game published by Capital Gains Studio and will be launched and demonstrated at Spiel Essen 2018.

About Capital Gains Studio Pte. Limited

We are a Singapore-based game design and publisher on a mission to inspire financial and economic learning through high-quality table-top games. Driven by our principles of fun, social interaction and education, we crack our brains to blend psychology, educational principles and humor to create table-top games which are simple to learn, with a high level of re-playability. Our games are also regularly used by educators to facilitate learning in workshops and classrooms.

Our published games include Wongamania: Malaysia Edition, Wongamania: Classic, Wongamania: Banana Economy and Debtzilla. The games are distributed in major bookstores, toy shops and board game retailers in Asia. We design financial games that reflect the real financial world and our games are also regularly used by educators to facilitate learning in workshops and classrooms.

Contact us: name Xeo Lye –  Co-founder – contact number +65 9625 9869

Find out more here: www.capitalgainsgroup.com.

Follow Capital Gains Studio on Facebook and Instagram.

PREVIEW: Raccoon Tycoon from Forbidden Games launched on Kickstarter June 19

PREVIEW: Raccoon Tycoon from Forbidden Games launched on Kickstarter June 19

From the brilliant folks at Forbidden Games (Glenn Drover of Age of Empires III: The Board Game fame and Jason Kapalka, a co-founder and chief game designer at PopCap, makers of video games such as Bejeweled, Peggle and Plants vs Zombies, comes Raccoon Tycoon, launching on Kickstarter on June 19, 2018.

What’s Raccoon Tycoon All About?

In Raccoon Tycoon, Astoria is a land bustling with productivity and growth! New towns, factories, and railroads are springing up across the land. A few savvy business tycoons (you and your opponents) are determined to make their fortunes on the crest of this wave. These tycoons start out as the producers of the key commodities: wheat to feed the growing towns and factories, wood and iron to build them, coal to fuel the trains and factories, and manufactured goods and luxuries to fill the insatiable demand of the animals of Astoria. Cornering the market for the most valuable commodities can create small fortunes that can be invested in the new businesses, turning them into huge fortunes. The sky is the limit during this Gilded Age!

Gameplay

In Raccoon Tycoon, players try to produce the most valuable commodities in an ever changing marketplace. They then use those commodities to build towns, or sell them at the best price to secure great profits that can be used to win auctions for the all-important railroads. The profits may also be used to buy powerful buildings that give the players power-ups or bonuses in production. Owning the best towns and railroads determines victory. There can be only one ‘top dog’ in Astoria. Is it you?

Raccoon Tycoon

Highlights

  • A fun, fast, economic game, with many unique paths to victory
  • Great for Gateway as well as Hardcore Gamers
  • The best aspects of several classic economic games without the baggage
  • Integrated Supply-and-Demand mechanic regulates prices in the game marketplace
  • Animal Tycoons! (editor’s note: Italics are ours!)
  • Artwork by world renowned artist: Annie Stegg Gerard

Game Time: 90 minutes

Players: 2 – 5

Complexity: 2/5

The game will launch on Kickstarter on June 19th so watch for it later in the month!

PRESS RELEASE: NO LIMIT GAMES PRESENTS BATTLE OF SOULS

PRESS RELEASE: NO LIMIT GAMES PRESENTS BATTLE OF SOULS

NO LIMITS, INC PRESENTS BATTLE OF SOULS, AN EXTENSIBLE CARD GAME

May 29th, Los Angeles, CA – Battle of Souls is an action-packed card battle game that combines what is great about the deck-building genre without being locked into starter decks or randomized booster packs. Why should collectors that can afford better cards dominate games? Battle of Souls equalizes the playing field and injects the purity of deck building strategy back into the game. Choose from a multitude of legendary historical warriors and pit them against one another in a battle of souls!

No Limit Games came up with the vision for Battle of Souls card game in 2015. The premise was to create the same feeling you gained from a standard “trading card game” but without the “pay to win” mechanism. Much like the game Othello, we wanted a play style that was challenging, easy to learn, has great replayability, and was fun without having to hunt down rare cards.

While we understand and appreciate that aspect of the trading card game market, we also felt there was an alternative approach that was lacking. Battle of Souls’ major selling point is that there are no starter decks, pre-constructed decks, or randomized booster packs. In some games, players that cannot afford to buy the expensive rare cards have a hard time playing against players with decks worth several hundred dollars. Battle of Souls’ concept is to remove the need to purchase overpriced single cards and hundreds of randomized booster packs with
hopes of getting the rare items they need in order to compete. Instead, with Battle of Souls, each set box that a player gets will contain all of the cards for that specific warrior group. Our game will be focused on the players’ deck building skills instead of how much money they put into the deck.

Playing the game is simple. Build your 40-60 card deck using no more then 4 copies of any single card and no more then 3 legendary warriors. Shuffle and start playing. In the game you have 7 types of cards: “Fighters” – Warrior, Elite Warrior, Warlord, & Legendary Warrior. “Support” – Tactics, Equipment, Battlefield.

The Warrior class cards don’t require anything special to play them. You can deploy one fighter per turn. When your warrior gets 3 kills then you can sacrifice it for an Elite Warrior. After 5 kills on your Elite Warrior you can sacrifice it for a Warlord. After 7 kills on your Warlord, you can sacrifice it, plus an Elite Warrior and a Warrior for a Legendary Warrior. Equipment and tactic cards can be played as many as you desire per turn, (up to 6 can be active at the same time). Lastly only one battlefield can be active on the entire field.

From our initial idea to the game we have today has been a process of refining through playtesting and feedback at numerous in-stores and conventions. Our goal was to have the game be focused on the player’s deckbuilding skills as opposed to how much money they have to build the perfect deck. We think we have met that goal.

This game was also shown on the Boardgame Babylon YouTube Channel:

The Kickstarter launched on May 29th, 2018. It will run for 40 days, ending on Sunday July 8th, 2018 with a goal of $11,000. The rewards each include our deluxe box that contains both Samurai and Viking sets in one box.

BGB Video: Ice Cream Empire is live on Kickstarter

Ice Cream Empire from Empire Games is live on Kickstarter. I had a chance to chat with Lars Thorn while at Gamex 2018, the designer and maker of booze-based party games. Lars has an electric personality and gives me an overview of his other titles, including Read Between The Wines, Brew-Ha-Ha and the upcoming Whisky Business.

Strategicon hosted many plays of both ICE and Whisky Business, with many happy players enjoying themselves.

For more information on Ice Cream Empire, Lars’ partnership with Sweet Rose Creamery, check out his Kickstarter page. The game will be available via Amazon this fall.

Boardgame Babylon likes to highlight games from local designers and publishers. If you are based in California and would like us to help promote your game, just write to us ahead of your release and give us plenty of lead time.

PRESS RELEASE – UNICARDS: A Unicorn Card Game Hits Kickstarter

PRESS RELEASE – UNICARDS: A Unicorn Card Game Hits Kickstarter

Unicards is a Card Game for Unicorn Lovers.

Long Island, NY, May 29 – Amanda Cappa of Unicards, LCC launches Unicards – A Unicorn Card Game on Kickstarter.

Designer Amanda Cappa is excited to announce her first ever game, which puts Unicorns in a Card Game, aka Unicards!Unicards

Unicards is a simple and fun card game for ages 6 and up. The game can be played with two to four players, and it takes about ten minutes to play. Be the first player to collect four Unicards and you win!

There are seven Unicards in the deck. Set these at the center of the table and shuffle the remaining cards. There are 42 Unicorn Playing Cards, 2 Wild Rainbow Unicorn Cards, and 1 Dark Horse Card.

The dealer is the player who loves Unicorns the most. Each player is dealt five cards. The remaining cards get set facedown on the table, with the top card flipped over.

Players take turns drawing card and trying to create a Unicard. How does one do this? Simply collect color matching horns, manes, and hooves to create a Unicard. If you can create one, shout “Unicard” on your turn and collect it.

There are two of these in the deck! If you pick one up, you are magical! Use your Wild Rainbow Unicorn Card to replace any color or part of a unicorn that you need.

Uh-Oh! You drew or were dealt the Dark Horse Card. Put all of your cards in the discard pile, including the Dark Horse Card. Draw five new cards from the deck, and your turn is over. If you collected any Unicards before drawing the Dark Horse Card, those go back to the center of the table.

What are people saying about Unicards?

“A fun, easy to learn card game for all ages. I love playing this game with my 6 year old granddaughter and her parents. The colors of the cards are so vibrant and inviting. Even my husband enjoys this game, and he’s not much of a game player” ~ Karen (Retired Conductor, LI)

“I’m so glad I’ve found this game! It’s great to play with my kids (ages 4 and 7)! We take it out when adults are over for game night too. It’s fast paced, easy to learn, and the right amount of luck vs. strategy!” ~ Amanda (Middle School Orchestra Teacher, NY)

“It’s truly the perfect game for unicorn lovers. I was so excited to get my very own copy that I wanted to play it all the time. My husband and I brought it to a bar and played it with random strangers. We made new friends, had lots of laughs, and were able to continue conversation while playing!” ~ Kaitlyn (Hotel Manager, VA)

“As a teacher, I think Unicards is a great game for both kids and families. It is a simple game for young children to understand, but also engaging enough for the whole family! You’re guaranteed to have a great time playing Unicards! I cannot wait to get a copy of my own so I can bring it into my classroom for my students to enjoy” ~ Dana (Elementary Teacher, NYC)

About Amanda Cappa

Amanda was born and raised on Long Island. She went to Northwestern University to receive her Bachelor of Music in Music Education and Saxophone Performance. Amanda earned her masters degree from Teachers College, Columbia University in Music Education. Amanda is a music teacher, unicorn lover, and new business owner. She is in her fourth year of her career, and is about to release her very first card game, which is Unicorn-related, of course!  

I am overjoyed by the support of my family, friends, and Unicorn lovers. I love everything about this game. My heart and soul have gone into it, and I can only hope that you will love it too. This Kickstarter campaign will allow me to produce Unicards on a larger scale. This press release will help spread the word about Unicards so everyone can get their own game soon!”

This project is LIVE on Kickstarter: http://kck.st/2xwmuD1                                                        

Unicards On Twitter: @unicardsgame

PRESS RELEASE: Wizkids Release Fungeon Party

PRESS RELEASE: Wizkids Release Fungeon Party

Hillside, NJ – May 14, 2018 – WizKids is excited to announce a new game that puts the Fun in dungeon, Fungeon Party! Designed by Brian Lewis, David McGregor, Marissa Misura, and Tom Jones, this is a fast-paced, quest completion game which takes a traditional dungeon party and puts them in a truly untraditional dungeon crawler.

2 to 5 players pick a class from a list of classic adventure choices; such as Barbarian, Cleric, Ranger, and Wizard, just to name a few. Each class has their own stats, which can be upgraded as experience points are earned, as well as a special ability that will help the party complete a pile of at least 6 quests.

Quest cards are drawn from a stack and placed in the middle of all players. Using a cell phone or stopwatch, a timer is set for 30 seconds per quest, so 6 quests would be a 3-minute timer. Someone yells “GO”, the top quest card is flipped over, and the goal is to complete all quests before the timer runs out! Sounds simple, but is it?

What types of quests would you expect in a Fungeon? Stack dice on your forehead, bounce dice into the box, knock down a meeple surrounded by dice, balance a meeple on a stick. These and many more wacky quests await the brave adventures that travel through the corridors of a Fungeon!

Gather your party and check out this quick, easy, and FUN game to learn and play! Fungeon Party will be available at your Friendly Local Game Store June 2018 for $29.99. Pre-order today!

For more information, visit: https://wizkids.com/fungeon-party/

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For Media Inquiries: Press@WizKids.com

For Distribution Inquires: Orders@WizKids.com

For Review Requests: https://wizkids.com/review-submission-form/