Dungeons and Dragons Makes An Appearance Inside Casinos

Dungeons and Dragons Makes An Appearance Inside Casinos

GUEST POST

Dungeons and Dragons has been an inspirational tabletop game for decades. The worldwide popularity of this fantasy game from E. Gary Gygax and David Arneson has allowed the game to branch out to other genres including popular video games, board games and arcade machines. Now, Dungeons and Dragons has inspired a whole new type of game: slot machines.

Konami Holdings Corporation, the company that makes amazing games for consoles has now released two slot machines themed to Dungeons and Dragons entitled, ‘Conquest and Treasures’ and ‘Enchanted Riches’. While many Hasbro board games have been used as the inspiration for slot machines in the past, this is the first time that a tabletop role-playing game has been used as a theme for slot machines.

Dungeons Dragons Casino
image credit: agbrief.com

“The players we see this day and age are out looking for entertainment, and there’s a lot of entertainment value in the new Dungeons & Dragons slot machines,” said Randy Reedy, Vice President of slot operations for Casino Valley View. “They really enjoy the experience. Just watching them, they get excited about additional bonuses within the free spin feature, which takes them to the progressive functionality. It’s very fun and interactive.”

Creating a slot machine that uses TV show icons such as characters from Star Trek, comic book heroes, and video game titles as themes has been an ongoing trend with both brick-and-mortar casinos and online gaming providers. Even cutesy themes are being used to attract players that have a taste for all things fluffy and pink, which is evident with titles such as Spin Genie’s uber popular, ‘Fluffy Favourites’. Konami hopes that their ‘Conquest and Treasures’ and ‘Enchanted Riches’ will not only engage fans of the tabletop game who are old enough to play in casinos but also patrons who appreciate groundbreaking graphics and animation.

Both slot machines will have a “4-level progressive” and “Xtra Reward” features, which are functions popularized by Konami. For people new to their games, Konami’s Xtra Reward and 4-level progressive are features that can be unlocked within the game. The 4-level progressive is like a video game’s optional quest where players can win big prizes, while Xtra Reward is a payout line that allows players to bet bigger and receive better prizes.

About the author:

Leo Smith has been an avid gamer since he was a child. A huge fan of Dungeons and Dragons, he also enjoys The Sims and Command and Conquer, among other titles.

Header image credit: ggrasia.com

Session Review: Darkest Night, 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games

Session Review: Darkest Night, 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games

As a fan of cooperative games, I’ve been interested to try Victory Point GamesDarkest Night for a while. The sub-genre is one of my favorites and I find it hard to believe it’s almost a decade on since Pandemic made its splash onto the board game scene and inspired the hobby to get on the cooperative game train. Sure, it had predecessors but Matt Leacock’s tightly-designed end-of-the-world wonder introduced a larger audience to the sub-genre and we’ve had a lot of great ones and many not-so-great ones since then.

DN‘s publisher is run by Alan Emrich. Alan is a genuine hero for Southern California gamers, as one of the guys responsible for the Strategicon series of conventions while making many other contributions to the hobby even before he launched VPG. I was glad to hear they were doing a new edition of the game with updated rules, gorgeous new miniatures and stretch goals-a-go-go. Having recently gotten interested in the design work of local designer Jeremy Lennert anyway (his Hunt: The Unknown Quarry was recently brought into digital form thanks also to a Kickstarter campaign), I thought it was finally the chance to give it a go. Jeremy was kind enough to explain the game for me and ‘referee’ a play of the title at a recent game event, which I partially Periscoped while we got the rules explanation if you’re inclined to give it a look.

Darkest Night is a fantasy-themed cooperative game but it’s no Pandemic clone (that’s Defenders of the Realm). Instead, Darkest Night draws more from the feel of adventure-oriented co-ops that give players more of a chance to develop their character (think Runebound or Return of the Heroes). This is welcome because one of the problems with co-ops is the tendency for one player to kind of take over everyone’s roles (“The Director,” they are often politely called). Darkest Night gives players an opportunity to develop themselves out with powers from their own deck of 10 cards (13, if stretch goals happen). I’m also in love with the statistic the characters have. No typical “Strength” and “Dexterity” stuff here. Instead, you have “Grace” (hit points) and “Secrecy” (how hard you are to find). The way Secrecy works is intriguing since this value will govern how easy it is for the Necromancer to find you. Kind of like Fearsome Floors, he’ll move to the closest player he detects when he moves.

The new edition has gorgeous miniatures that you can buy as an add-on plus some expanded rules. While this was my first play of the game and I cannot compare the new rules to the old, it would appear the updates expand the options available and make the game even more flexible. As with many games, it’s the cards that bring the variation to life. The new edition adds even more event cards, which are drawn from most locations. These cards can lead to conflicts, bad mojo stuff happening that will provide you misery and, occasionally, something not terrible. While the different cards are welcome, they do feel very 80’s Games Workshop, as they usually have a die roll to see what happens. I’m of two minds on that one. While the additional variation of cards not always doing the same thing can be enjoyable, there are times when you get results like “nothing happens.” Kind of a yawn but okay if it happens rarely. In our game, it happened more than that.

The Event cards also trigger some interesting elements to add to the board, including Quests. These are opportunities for characters to complete a task to gain an advantage but they also come with timers. The urgency and interest these provide make for a richer game and it’s a welcome mechanism. There are also Artifacts and Mystery cards that provide some other opportunities for interaction with game mechanisms that help players along. We played on a prototype board so it is hard to judge it but there are a lot of things that can show up on the board and it can get a bit crowded, but all of these elements work well for the game.

Then the bad guy gets a turn (notably, after all players get a go – not like Pandemic where it happens after each player). Blights (or the ‘infection cubes’, if you like) that get dropped out onto the board are implemented in an interesting way as they turn regions of the board into startlingly difficult places to be. Instead of just stacking up to show their threat as in Pandemic, Blights provide a specific penalty to the players at the location where they sprout. They’ll hit you for a combat or evading penalty or some other problem. Blights works well – in fact, my only issue with the Blights is the design of the tiles. While you are usually defending against or evading them, those values are quite small. Near the bottom, in a MUCH bigger font is the value you need to roll to defeat them (and the penalty for failure), but this is less often used. Were I their graphic designer, I’d switch those immediately to increase the ease of use because we kept having to squint to complete the action we did the most with these guys.

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Session Review: Darkest Night 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games (continued)

Session Review: Darkest Night 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games (continued)

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While Blight works well, I do wish I could see the effort help us manage the threats. While removing them reduces frustration, I had a hard time tracking how our efforts were helping in the battle against the Necromancer. Once in a while, something we did reduce the ‘Darkness’ (a marker not unlike the Knizia Lord of the Rings tracker, or the Minion Hunter –  the precursor to all of these games – track that all four threats live on), which felt like we were striking a blow. Too often, though, our efforts felt like they were just us swatting flies away from our efforts to get enough artifacts to get enough clues to do…something. While the turns were short, a lot of times, it just felt like we weren’t doing very much and yet turns have a lot going on from an administrative perspective. You start with that event card, which can often turn into multiple event cards. Then you do your action: moving (again, a whole turn to travel makes sense in the name of the mechanisms but not in the name of players feeling a sense of accomplishment), taking a single swipe at a Blight (miss the roll and the turn is over, bub, which could mean another event or just lost Grace), or do something with one of the cards on the space. You can also just rest to restore Grace. Then, you need to deal with any monster Blights (either fight them off – notably, not killing them – or just evade them).

Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 12.42.40 PMThere are just an awful lot of turns. The length of a turn is a challenging problem. As a eurogamer, I’m no fan of lost turns. While the Web (a Blight that makes a player lose a turn when they leave a space with it) is manageable because you can opt to fight and remove Blights, it is less appealing to go to the Monastery and pray, only to find that you get absolutely nothing for it with bad rolls. I won’t make a religious joke here but I will say that I’d rather see the devotion do you good regardless of the dice. Darkest Night has that war-game sense of resolutional luck rather than situational luck. I’m sure that’s a lot of the appeal for RPG players and the huge community of fans the game enjoys (which has led to many expansions).

Unfortunately, the storytelling is not as strong as the interesting mechanisms. The names are all generic and the board is made up of a handful of locations that have functional names “Monastery” and “Swamp,” that are descriptive but not evocative. While the Necromancer is a threat somehow, it’s not something that comes out in the game much. In Pandemic, you’re saving the world (real places with city names) from the disease and the paths to a loss make it clear what is happening. This is even more powerful and effective in the truly awesome Pandemic Legacy. In Knizia’s Lord of the Rings, Knizia benefits from the legendarily intriguing Middle Earth, which is abstracted out but there is a definite sense of location with the unique characteristics of the areas.

It’s an interesting problem. Is it more appealing to let players imagine their own names with the characters to tell their own story? Sure, I buy that idea. The 29 characters and their unique 13 card decks provide players with a chance to experience the game many different ways, adding to the replay value of the game. Yet, I can’t say the same for those generic name for the locations on the board. There’s nothing particularly inspiring about going to The Forest or The Castle. That’s where the storytelling would be welcome. Even the Necromancer seems to want a name to make him seem more grounded and real. As a double-size cardboard standee, he looks imposing but without a backstory or more visible signs of the impending doom, Darkest Night’s story didn’t hold my attention for the full length of the game, even though the mechanisms are strong.

Darkest Night plays in two to three hours but it was a first game for our crew so it ran longer. I think my recent forays into three-hour games of Star Wars: Rebellion may have given me a false sense of my stamina for over two-hour games. I believe the storytelling strength of Star Wars: Rebellion is why three hours with that game feels like not enough time. Of course, familiarity with almost, ahem, forty years of Star Wars in my life means there is a built-in level of interest there. Still, I think the rich theming is what makes it all the more compelling and keeps players deeply engaged.

Darkest Night 2nd Edition is good fun for RPG cooperative board gamers and is available now on Kickstarter. It’s already funded but a bunch of excellent stretch goals await. I recommend you check it out because if you like this kind of game, you get a whole lot of fun in this new edition. The campaign runs through June 11 and the details can be found here.

Boardgame Babylon Rating

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Press Release: Puzzle Adventures: Millions of fans look forward to the app version of Ravensburger‘s online puzzle hit

Press Release: Puzzle Adventures: Millions of fans look forward to the app version of Ravensburger‘s online puzzle hit

Munich/Ravensburg, April 28th, 2016: Ravensburger’s most successful social game is now available as an app. Fans of Puzzle Adventures can now also enjoy their favorite game on their smartphone or tablet.

Just a few weeks after its launch on Facebook in 2011, the game from Ravensburger was already a huge hit, with hundreds of thousands of players racing against the clock to put the small puzzle pieces together. And the fan base has grown steadily: to date, more than eight million people have played this addictive game.

“Puzzle Adventures is a unique success story for us”, Thomas Bleyer, director of Ravensburger Digital, declared. “With no other title have we reached so many players around the world. That is what is so fascinating about puzzles: Anyone can immediately start playing without any explanation; there are virtually no language barriers. That is surely one of the reasons why our game is so successful internationally. Our players come from more than 200 countries around the globe.”

Many fans were asking for a mobile version of the game. That is why Puzzle Adventures is now available as a free app for iOS and Android devices.

Puzzle Adventures is the result of combining fast-paced, exciting and competitive gameplay with more than 100 years of puzzle expertise at Ravensburger, Europe’s largest producer of jigsaw puzzles. The digital adaptation offers hectic action: Who can finish first and who can put the most difficult puzzles together?

Now, anytime and anywhere, you can play individual puzzles that only take a few minutes to solve. Playing against the clock ensures it is thrilling, while different levels of difficulty and a clever reward system motivate the player to keep puzzling.

You also meet ‘Jiggy’ and ‘Valentina’: these cute puzzle pieces with big round eyes provide useful tips and guide you through the different puzzle worlds with over 40 wonderful themes: colourful country life, fantasy worlds, animal kingdom, a world of dreams… There are over 700 different designs and more themes are being added all the time, making Puzzle Adventures a truly fascinating adventure for all puzzle fans.

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id1005048909

Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ravensburgerdigital.puzzleadventures

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01DBVHEFS

More information from the publisher: www.ravensburger-digital.com | www.ravensburger-games.com

Unboxing Babylon: Boardgame Babylon opens up

Unboxing videos for board games have been popular for years. I’ve never watched one. For some reason, I figured maybe I’d start to understand their appeal by recording one. My kids think I’m nuts and they’re probably right. But who cares? Conveniently, I had two boxes handy to open up. I received the Geek and Sundry Nerdblock (only about two weeks after they said it was shipped) and recently grabbed up Star Wars: Rebellion. So, here’s a quick (hmm…maybe not quick but more like twenty minutes) video of me talking through the opening up process.

Do I understand why unboxing videos are appealing now? Maybe. If you’re keen to see all those new components (SW: Rebellion is wonderful here), this is cool. I guess if you were on the fence about Lootcrate or another subscription service, it might help show me what’s what in the latest versions that might have skipped out on ordering. To be honest, I’ve avoided those subscription services because I feared mostly remaindered, clearance geek crap no one wants.

Is that what happened with my unboxing experience? Well, check the video below (streamed on Periscope to a very small audience) to see how the Nerdblock turned out.

Star Wars: Rebellion is the second half but I mostly just open things up to see what it all looks like. I’m excited to play the game with my son tomorrow and give this monster but very interesting game a shot. The double-board setup is so massive that I expect we’ll need to set up a second table to fit it. That sheer scale has my son excited – he’s already a bigger Star Wars fan than I am so this is right up his alley. I’ve had more luck getting him to the table with Imperial Assault and X-Wing than almost any other game (yeah, he loves Smash-Up, too).

Anyway, so maybe I kind of get unboxing. It’s not what I call ‘full-attention entertainment’ (FAE). In other words, I’m expecting you listen/watch it while doing at least one other thing. I had fun recording it and hope other people will do so, too. We’ll see if it happens again.

Session Review: Fisticuffs by The Nerdologues

Session Review: Fisticuffs by The Nerdologues

Fisticuffs was a successful Kickstarter from a parallel universe to the one where gamer boardgames exist. Like Cards Against Humanity or The Oatmeal’s Exploding Kittens game, these titles are a lot about the humor and creativity of the individuals involved – sometimes at the expense of game play. While apologists will defend the titles as ‘a fun experience’ and ‘crowd-dependent,’ serious gamers just need to know what they’re getting themselves into.

I approached Fisticuffs with that thought in mind, especially since the game ‘sold’ me on the designers being ‘a bunch of people you don’t know but could totally be friends with.’ That’s good marketing and I admire it.

I also love party games and I’m fine with including lighter games that sometimes include a take-that feel as part of a day of gaming. Heck, I played Red Dragon Inn more times last year than any Feld game except Die Burgen Von Burgund (the booze helps).

Fisticuffs is one such game, playing with 4 to 6 players in just 20 or so minutes. The idea of the game is like Brawl, TKO and JAB before it – let players essentially duke it out over a few rounds Board Gameuntil you can declare a winner. While the Brawl and JAB do the realtime thing (which some find overwhelming), Fisticuffs plays like a normal card game but allows people to join in the fray even when it’s not their turn.

The rules are simple. Players choose a character, all of whom have funny names but some of whom have special powers you’ll never use. Players get cards of different colors with various punches and attacks on them. On your turn, you play a card to attack someone. They can block it with the same named card (e.g., an Uppercut blocks an Uppercut). If you don’t block, other players can. If a block happens, a card of the same color can be used to counter-attack. And so on, but now you can target any other players who got involved. Yes, everyone at the table can potentially join in. Yes, it gets a bit confusing – which is part of the fun? When a blow finally goes unblocked, the person hit loses some of their twelve starts hit points. Then, the same thing happens next turn.

Once everyone gets a turn, you can reload cards and you get some defensive cards from a secondary deck. These “Round” cards (not round like BB-8 – you get one each round) have more ’tactical’ options. This all continues until you’re down to two players and then the rules simplify further. Someone wins, it’s over.

Needless to say that despite the mild amusement from the humor (primarily from the character cards), our players didn’t find much to engage them in Fisticuffs. After the first turn, people were more conservative with getting involved in brawls. The artwork is basic but not so much so that we thought it was being intentionally bad for comic effect. The simplicity likely helped keep costs down for the Kickstarter and that makes sense.

I’m glad the Nerdologues got the backing to make their game a reality because I love crowdsourcing to help creative projects. I hope the 600 or so folks who backed it have a great time with Fisticuffs. But it’s just not for me. While Brawl is the be-all, end-all fighting card game, TKO gets you the theme for less money (Brawl costs per deck, TKO is ludicrously cheap) with a limit of two players. If you love the theme, Fisticuffs does get this experience with a multiplayer option and the funny back story (which you can enjoy in the video above) is worth a look.

This copy of Fisticuffs will be donated to the Strategicon Game Library so you can give it a try at Gamex 2016 (and beyond) to see if it’s more to your taste than mine.

Boardgame Babylon Rating

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: Copy provided by the publisher for independent review.

Session Review: Knit Wit by Matt Leacock

Session Review: Knit Wit by Matt Leacock

Most modern gamers love beautiful components. Maybe it’s a reaction to our excessive screentime these days, where we travel in magical, wondrous worlds that we can see and hear but cannot touch. For me, that’s a lot of the appeal of board games. Having physical pieces to handle while looking at the faces of friends and family. We’re even funding crazy-gorgeous deluxe versions of games (hoping they arrive SOMEDAY). So, it was just a tiny bit surprised when someone at our table commented that Knit Wit, the new game from Matt Leacock, was ‘really overproduced.’

Sure, microgames have shown us that exceptional game experiences can come in small packages. Heck, there are some really cool print and IMG_7906play games. That doesn’t mean fillers cannot come in big ones. Knit Wit is indeed a short yet enjoyable game that comes in a big box that might make some players think it could have been produced for a lower price. Okay, maybe that’s true. We’ve already seen Flick ‘Em Up downgraded to make it more affordable. I say that’s a bummer but people are usually on a budget so is Knit Wit worth your $35 (MSRP)?

Knit Wit is one of those word games that feels immediate both because it is familiar and good. The elevator pitch is “Scattergories with Venn Diagrams.” Yeah, that’s a solid description I wish I’d used initially when explaining it rather than talking about how to place spools. Players essentially set up a bunch of spools, clothespins, and strings in patterns on a table. The clothespins get small cards with words added to them. Then, based on where the spools get placed, everyone gets a Scattergories list going. The word for each spool needs to take into account the strings that surround it. Thus, Spool Number 5 (there are 8) might be inside the string with a clothespin that has the word “Bad” as well as the one that says “Boring.” So, players would write a word or brief phrase that is both “Bad” and “Boring” (i.e., Superman vs. Batman or post-Nirvana 90’s Rock or maybe Krysten Ritter’s performance in Jessica Jones).

Speed matters, too. Those who fill out their answers quicker (or fill out as many as they know) can stop writing and grab a bonus button, of which there are four, with descending values (simply, elegantly denoted by the number of holes on the buttons). Players then share their answers, with any matches (same answer for a spool) being lost. Like Scattergories, it helps to go a little obscure. But don’t push it; players can challenge your questionable answers and put them to a vote. Then, you total up scored answers with bonuses and it’s over. Until you immediately play it a second time. This is even encouraged by the double-sided score pages, which are on black paper with white pencils to write on them. Love it.IMG_7925

 

Final Word

Knit Wit is definitely a good time and was liked by all of our casual gamer friends. More serious word nerds may wish for there to be something more but I say that it’s a pleasant game for all and a likely closer for us in the future.

So what about those components? Well, they’re lovely. The spools are sturdy and pleasing to hold. Buttons, clothespins and other components, especially the unexpectedly rigid (in a good way) word cards are all thematic and fun to hold, even if you wonder whether Z-Man Games hit a JoAnn Fabrics closing sale or something. The box itself is pretty nice, although the slip cover is the only serious misfire. The box closes fine but the slip cover (which, seriously, gamers can’t throw away) is just a pain to put back on. Didn’t they learn to stop with the box innovations after the Lords of Waterdeep fiasco?

In the end, I’m glad to own Knit Wit but I also think that it’s $35 price tag might prevent some sales. If the Z-less Man (had to be said) had found a way to produce the game for $20 in the way that Codenames did, they’d have a mass-market possibility. As it is, it’s a welcome addition to my collection and gamers who love pretty word games that play quickly will enjoy it. Fans of Matt’s other games should know from the packaging that they’re not getting another world-on-fire cooperative game and may indeed be happily surprised to see him turn out a cool little word game like this one.

Boardgame Babylon Rating

BIN (Buy It Now)   PIN (Play It Now)   TIF (Try It First)   NMT (Not My Thing)

Press Release: Great Scott! – The Game of Mad Invention

Press Release: Great Scott! – The Game of Mad Invention

The first offering from the UK’s Sinister Fish Games hits Kickstarter on April 13th.

After over a year of design, development, and playtesting, Great Scott! – The Game of Mad Invention is ready to be unleashed! Gamers who enjoy the card drafting and scoring mechanics of games like 7 Wonders, and the humorous storytelling of Snake Oil will find endless opportunities for fun and strategy in this Victorian themed inventing game.

Great Scott! launches on Kickstarter on April 13th with a price point of £16 (approximately $23 / €21) which includes worldwide shipping, and an EU Friendly option.

The game has been a hit with playtesters and reviewers alike, with the overwhelming opinion expressed that the game is just plain FUN! Which is what we’re all here for, right?

With 180 cards featuring clean, clear graphic design, and 60 period illustrations provided by the British Library, Great Scott! looks as good as it plays.

Gamers interested in showing early support for Great Scott! on Kickstarter can sign up to the Friends of Sinister Fish mailing list to be alerted as soon as the campaign goes live.

Board Games

About The Game

Queen Victoria has summoned inventors from all over the Empire to compete in a grand contest to decide who will earn the title of Royal Inventor.

Players take on the roles of the inventors, and construct ridiculous contraptions using asset and concept cards. After 5 rounds of drafting, taking around 3-5 minutes, each player then explains their invention to the other players, who must award hidden commendation points to their favorites.

Inventions are scored for their base value plus bonuses for combining the various card types. In an innovative twist, bonus points are also awarded for alliteration, making inventions such as the “Diabolical Dynamite Deployed Donkey Deterrent” an extremely high scoring creation! The winner is the player with the most points after 3 rounds.

Nearly a billion possible inventions, for Her Majesty, and for science!


Number of players: 3–5 (more if fewer rounds are played)

Time required: 20–40 minutes

Recommended ages: 13+

Sinister Fish Games website: http://www.sinisterfish.com

Great Scott! image gallery: http://www.sinisterfish.com/media/

Kickstarter preview: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/sinisterfish/1112238460?token=4cd7faa2

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sinisterfishgames/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/thesinisterfish

Press Release: Enigma Distribution handles the edition and the distribution of TOKAIDO for the Dutch speaking market.

Press Release: Enigma Distribution handles the edition and the distribution of TOKAIDO for the Dutch speaking market.

(ed. note: Yes, Eric is a little more inclined to post news about Tokaido for obvious reasons…)

Benelux – March 24th, 2016

Today, we are very pleased to announce that, starting from now, Enigma Distribution will handle the Tokaido™  classic edition of the French publisher and distributor Funforge, for the Dutch speaking market.

For now, this partnership only concerns the Tokaido™ classic edition, part of the TokaidoTM product line (200.000 units sold worldwide – at the present day), which includes the following products: Tokaido™ classic edition (2012), Tokaido Crossroads™ (first expansion, 2013), Tokaido Matsuri™ (second expansion, 2016), Tokaido Collector’s Accessory Pack™ (2016) and the Tokaido Deluxe Edition™ (2016).

Both Enigma Distribution and Funforge are delighted to work together on the Tokaido™ classic edition.

Tokaido

ABOUT ENIGMA DISTRIBUTION

Founded in 2011, Enigma Distribution is a distributor and publisher of exclusive brands and board and card games for the Dutch speaking market. They are specialized in Trading Card Games and collectibles.

Well-known brands from their portfolio are Panini™, Pokémon™, Yu-Gi-Oh!™ and Magic: The Gathering™.

Anne PRONK, Marketing & PR – anne@bergsalaenigma.nl

ABOUT FUNFORGE

Created in 2008, Funforge is a privately held company with office located in Paris – France, which publishes and distributes fun and beautiful card and board games for a wide audience, with great replayability.

Since its creation, Funforge became a recognized publisher in the boardgame industry, being distributed worldwide (France, US and North America, Germany, United Kingdom, Poland, Scandinavian countries, Russia, Japan, China…). The publishing of the Tokaido™ product line, and its 200.000 units sold worldwide (at the present day) achieved to establish Funforge as one of the world’s leading boardgame publisher.

The quality of its products and the prestige of internationally renown authors gave the publisher several prices in jury and international press.

Charlotte NOAILLES, Marketing & PR Manager – press@funforge.fr

Ameritrash Confessions, Part 1

Ameritrash Confessions, Part 1

More than a few fans of the old podcast and some close friends noticed a significant shift in my game plays sometime in 2014 but not all of them asked the obvious question directly. Most were coy about it, trying to find a casual way to say what was surprising them about the type of games they saw being featured on my social media feeds. “That doesn’t seem like a game you’d be interested in playing,” said one Facebook friend after I posted pictures of my third play of Mice & Mystics last year (and after three the previous year).

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The observer was correct; anyone who has been listening to my podcast during the last decade or following me on Twitter, Instagram or other social channels with any regularity could say the same thing, “You’re a dyed-in-wool eurogamer – how is it that you’re playing all of these Ameritrash/Experience games? Have you gone born-again Ameritrash?”

The answer is essentially ‘no’ but that doesn’t tell the whole story. I will endeavor to do that now.

A few years ago, I was playing a game with my family and yet I was feeling like a failure as a ‘gamer dad.’ The reason for my feeling was simple – even though I was playing a fun family game with my kids, it was WAY below their age range.

We were playing Qwirkle and, while I love that game, I was realizing that my teen and preteen had been Qwirkle Board Gamestuck in a loop playing games that were too young for them. Now, Qwirkle is good enough for anyone to play but the truth is that my kids were old enough to take on more challenging games but I’d failed to introduce them to the next step in more meaty games and so I was left still playing casual and younger-audience games with my kids.

Some time before, my good friend Devi Hughes, the man behind the Orange County Board Gamers (he and his wife), had talked about playing Le Havre with his kids who were younger than my own. Le Havre! Meanwhile, I was sheepishly playing 6+ and maybe 8+ games with my kids who were both three years older than his two kids. How did I let this happen?

Now, any gamer dad is happy to play games with their kids, almost regardless of what it is. That’s just being a good dad. But I saw the potential for my kids to play more serious games and felt like I’d missed some invisible shift from kid games to something more substantial. Sure, I played with friends and my wife will take on just about any game as long as she gets a play or two in with me first. But I wasn’t bringing my kids fully into the hobby like all gamers plan to do on one level or another.

I’d done so well with them at a younger age. They had played over 200 different games before they ever played Monopoly – and, even then, we only played it when I bought a stupidly cheap copy of it during the holidays and gave it to them as a joke Christmas gift. To my eternal delight, they hated it and my daughter actually uttered ‘It’s stupid that you just roll a die to move in this game.’ Seriously – be still my eurogamer heart.

None of the joy in their derisive attitude towards the hallmark of bad board games could change that I’d missed a transition somewhere. I decided I needed some dire measures to get things back on track.
Soon thereafter, I declared that, as a family, we’d be playing through the complete Alea series in order to kickstart the eurogamer souls I was supposed to be inspiring into my offspring. My daughter had grown less interested in games in the last year but she was sort of pressured into participating. I will say that once she got to the table, she would always have a good time and get into it (she’s a trifle competitive – actually, they both are. Good.)

As we were proceeding through this gauntlet (chronicled elsewhere), my son asked about Dungeons and Dragons. I explained that I’d played the game from elementary school to high school off-and-on but hadn’t played any role-playing games since the 80’s (I guess I’m dating myself there). I had no interest in role-playing games and when I moved on to purely board games (which had played before I ever tried RPGs), my personal group of gamers moved on with me. Other than my friend Clark occasionally complaining, everyone was fine with the move and no one suggested we go back to GURPS, Champions, Call of Cthulhu, Traveller and D&D.

Dungeons and Dragons

Yet, as I say, a good gamer dad encourages any kind of games (even video games, which I produced for many years so I was happy with that, too) so I sought out my friend Devi again, who was raising his kids on both board games and RPGs. He was kind enough to run a game of Dungeons and Dragons for us. As it happens, my longtime friend and fellow gamer, Chad Smith (who develops and designs with me sometimes), brought his own son to the game as well. Apparently, I wasn’t the only one whose offspring wondered about the game we had so enjoyed in our youth.

Soon enough, we settled down in our game room and played a massive 4th Edition game of D&D with a few adults and a bunch of kids. While Devi did a great job running the game, it wasn’t my cup of tea. It was about six hours of play for a couple of combats against some kobolds and some time walking down a road. My eurogamer mind imagined how much delightful cube-pushing, auctioning, trading, and negotiation play I could have enjoyed during that one long afternoon. I calculated the mix of fillers, meatier games, maybe a middle-weight or two thrown into the list. That would have been a better day than this excursion to kill kobolds and goblins while teenagers fussed about whose turn it was and wanting to go to town to ‘buy new boots.’ While that wasn’t my RPG experience in the 80’s, I’d always avoided players who did that sort of thing. The lengthy process of resolving battles felt flat to me. I wondered how some of my friends had so strongly embraced 4th Edition when it came out. Devi was a competent DM. The kids were a bit rambunctious and all but the whole thing just fell completely flat. I thought that clearly these experience games and Ameritrash just weren’t for me but I wasn’t done trying.

(to be continued)