Battle of the Bands: Deluxe Edition Ends September 1 – Great Game from a SoCal Designer

Battle of the Bands: Deluxe Edition Ends September 1 – Great Game from a SoCal Designer

Battle of the Bands isn’t a game that I should love but I really, really like the theme. Yes, Dan Smith’s game is oldschool, has some take-that stuff going on big time, and is random-a-go-go. Who cares when the humor, the art and the theme are so incredibly fun. For me, this is like Red Dragon Inn, a game that has such a fun theme that my eurosnoot sensibilities get checked at the door. The game itself has been out for about 15 years so it was time for an upgrade anyway.

The game is also from Dan Smith, a local game designer (and talented illustrator) from Southern California and longtime BGB listeners/readers know that I love to support my neighbors and friends. But it’s not just that – Battle of the Bands is really good fun and even if you’re just buying it for the Bowie card, get it now. The specials will only be part of the Kickstarter campaign and they’re truly special.

I would have been thrilled to interview Dan to promote the game but it somehow didn’t hit my radar. Here’s an interview with him, talking about the game. Check it out – it’s going to fun on Sept 1 so get on board now.

Did I mention the Bowie card?

Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 11.22.47 PM

 

PRESS RELEASE: RAINN Studios announces Incantris

RAINN Studios is proud to announce Incantris, a game of magical combat, coming to Kickstarter on September 7th. Each player controls a team of three wizards, each with unique spells and abilities. It is a fast-paced and thought-
provoking game that pairs strategy with a beautiful gaming environment.

Incantris features 25 different spells and abilities and a modular game board that can shift during the game. Each team of wizards is optimized for a different style of play for an asymmetric experience. Cast spells with an intuitive and exciting system that rewards cunning tactics. Incantris also features stunning artwork by Artur Jag and sculptures from Dan Jack of Atlantis Miniatures.

A review video is already live on YouTube:

To learn more, visit: www.incantris.com.

Number of Players: 2-4

Time Required: 25-60 minutes

Facebook: www.facebook.com/rainnstudios

RAINN Studios Site: www.rainnstudios.com

Twitter: www.twitter.com/RAINN_Studios

PRESS RELEASE: Stronghold Games and Spielworxx Announce Jointly the Publication of Sola Fide: The Reformation by Jason Matthews & Christian Leonhard

PRESS RELEASE: Stronghold Games and Spielworxx Announce Jointly the Publication of  Sola Fide: The Reformation by Jason Matthews & Christian Leonhard

The release of Sola Fide: The Reformation timed for the 500th Anniversary of The Reformation

New Jersey, USA and Billerbeck, Germany – August 8, 2016 –  Stronghold Games and Spielworxx are proud to announce jointly the publication of Sola Fide: The Reformation, a game designed by the renowned game design team of Jason Matthews and Christian Leonhard.

In Sola Fide: The Reformation, one player takes on the role of the Protestant movement, while the other plays the Catholic establishment. Players attempt to install Reformation in the Holy Roman Empire or try to prevent it, battling the Holy Roman Empire’s Imperial Circles. The game does not have a game board per say, but rather has 10 board tiles, each representing one of the Imperial Circles. Via card play, the two players try to win these ten Imperial Circles, each of which are worth 5 or 7 points. The game is for 2-players, ages 12+, and plays in 45 minutes.

Sola FideSola Fide: The Reformation faithfully tracks the Reformation, which Martin Luther started in 1517 with his “Ninety-Five Theses”. Luther criticized the selling of indulgences and that the Catholic doctrine of the merits of the saints had no foundation in the gospel. The “Protestants” soon incorporated doctrinal changes such as Sola Scriptura (“by scripture alone”) and Sola Fide (“by faith alone”).

The changes were not only theological, but also other factors played a role in The Reformation: the rise of nationalism, the Western Schism that eroded people’s faith in the Papacy, the perceived corruption of the Roman Curia, the impact of humanism, and the new learning of the Renaissance that questioned much of traditional thought. The Roman Catholic Church responded with a Counter-Reformation initiated by the Council of Trent.

The release of Sola Fide: The Reformation is timed with the 500th Anniversary in 2017 of The Reformation. Stronghold Games and Spielworxx commissioned the great game design team of Jason Matthews and Christian Leonhard to work specifically on this project. Matthews and Leonhard are foremost game design experts on historical games, previously designing 1960: The Making of the President, Founding Fathers, and Campaign Manager 2008. Jason Matthews also co-designed the critically acclaimed 1989: Dawn of Freedom, as well as Twilight Struggle, which is the #2 ranked game on Board Game Geek.

The release of Sola Fide: The Reformation continues the strategic partnership between Stronghold Games and Spielworxx, which was announced in December 2014, whereby Stronghold Games and Spielworxx would partner on select game releases.

Sola Fide

Sola Fide: The Reformation is scheduled for release to the general public in late October/November 2016. The MSRP for this game has not been set at this time. The game will make its debut at the Essen Spiel in Germany in October 2016.

Stronghold Games will release Sola Fide: The Reformation as the sixth game in its “The Great Designers Series”, which highlights games from the best game designers in the world.

About Stronghold Games

Stronghold Games LLC is a publisher of high-quality board and card games in the hobby game industry. Since 2009, Stronghold Games has released many highly-regarded games, including the best-selling “Survive: Escape From Atlantis!”, the most innovative deck-building game, “Core Worlds”, the smash-hit game line of “Space Cadets”, and many others. Stronghold Games publishes game designs developed both in-house and in partnership with publishers around the world. Stronghold Games is a Limited Liability Company formed in the State of Delaware USA.

About Spielworxx

Spielworxx was founded in 2010 in Germany and publishes cutting-edge board and card games for the gaming gourmet.

Contacts:

Stephen M. Buonocore, President

Stephen@StrongholdGames.com

Stronghold Games LLC

17 Sunflower Road

Somerset, NJ 08873 USA

Website: http://www.StrongholdGames.com

Phone: +1-908-304-5711

 

Uli Blennemann, President

uli@spielworxx.de

Spielworxx

Nielande 12

48727 Billerbeck

Germany

Website: http://www.spielworxx.de

Phone: +49-2543-9309107

Session Review: Imhotep from Phil Walker-Harding & KOSMOS

Session Review: Imhotep from Phil Walker-Harding & KOSMOS

Imhotep is a welcome addition to our gateway games collection, but I almost missed out on it. My first play was fine, but I was underwhelmed. This SDJ nominee was my final game of the day at an event last month. I had wanted to try out this title that was going to challenge Codenames for the Spiel Des Jahres and only spotted it late in the day. I had faith in the possibility that it could take on Vlaada Chvatil’s effortlessly wonderful party game because I’m a fan of Phil Walker-Harding‘s other games like Sushi Go!, Archaeology, Pack of Heroes, and Cacao. The game was loaned to me from another party who waited until I played before mentioning that he felt similarly (good, not great), suggesting that maybe the nomination was an Academy Award-style ‘make up for a previous snub’ to console the open wound of the excellent Cacao missing the cut. I nodded in agreement before taking off that night.

I was wrong. Imhotep deserved the nomination and the adoration of the SDJ jury. This is a very good game that I’ve now played nine times. Despite my first impression, I bought the game to play during our summertime game-cation (where we always sample the SDJ and KDJ nominees ahead of the announcements). I was impressed with the delight the newcomers experienced playing it and I how much enjoyed exploring the nuances of the game.

Imhotep Basics

Gameplay is straightforward and seems familiar, as with many great games. Players are trying to score points and win by placing stones on boats and delivering them to ports that let them score in various ways. This is done six times, with some scoring happening immediately, some happening at the end of the round, and the bulk of points coming at the end. The game has an old-school euro feel and I sense the strong influence of Michael Schacht, the master of minimalist designs that have incredible depth.

To play, you give your two to four players a pile of colored blocks and a sled tile that holds up to five stones at a time, select round cards based on the number of players you have, and then set up the modular port boards you opt to use. The port boards have two sides, with side A featuring ‘beginner’ options with simpler rules. There are also boats with one to four slots, four of which (in some combination of slots) you’ll bring up based on the round card. Each turn, players decide between three options: add up to three blocks from the player’s general supply to their sled, add a block to a boat from the sled, or sail a boat with enough blocks to a port for activation.

Imhotep

Four boats are available each round and they only can be sailed when one fewer than the number they will handle have been placed on them (pointless clarification: yes, the one-block boat needs a block). At that point, any player (whether or not they have a block on the boat) can sail it into a port. This is important because players can send a boat into a port that doesn’t help the players with blocks on it very much. Managing this narrow range of choices still makes for interesting decisions, even if it doesn’t sound that intriguing just reading the gameplay mechanisms.

There are five ports and only four boats, so one is skipped each round of play. Furthermore, fewer blocks can reach those ports if players send them early so there’s definitely some dynamics around whether players opt to play offensively or defensively. The ports resolve as the boats were loaded, with blocks at the front resolving first. In some cases, this gives that player first choice; on other ports, it just means their block goes into place first – sometimes to their frustration.

The ports are the way players score, but they work differently.

  • The Market lets players choose from a set of mostly face-up cards (the B side has facedown cards), which gives them various immediate or future chances to act or score. The blue cards are an effective way to do double actions, the red ones let you place a block into one of the other ports immediately, the purple are award set collecting points, and the green ones are end of game bonuses for the performance of other ports.
  • The Temple scores at the end of each round, with spaces for five blocks. The interesting bit here is that this option delivers points for the blocks viewable from above. Thus, blocks placed early can score over and over – and new blocks ruin this plan.
  • The Pyramid scores points immediately, but the loading order is a factor because different spaces provide different point rewards.
  • The Burial Chamber and the Obelisk ports both score competitively at the end. The former is pattern-based and loading order is a big deal, while the latter is a raw comparison on side A and a timing/commitment game on side B.

While the side A cards are ‘for beginners’, there is no reason for gamers to not begin with the side B variants. They are a trifle more complicated, but they also make the game better. Players sail the four boats six times before a winner is declared. With experienced players, it’s a satisfying thirty minutes.

Imhotep’s Modular Rules

Much has been made of Friedemann Friese’s 504, a game that takes rules variations to the extreme. Imhotep has some possibilities here but it’s done in a simpler way. Dominion popularized the inspiration from older games like Cosmic Encounter for modern euro games. Indeed, you can see a Dominion inspiration in the way Imhotep’s designer expanded his hit game Sushi Go! for Sushi Go Party (see my adoring review of that game here).

Imhotep

With Imhotep, the game’s central mechanism allows for new ports to be plugged in that score block placement in different ways. The flipside variants on the backside reminded me of Antoine Bauza, who famously mentioned on my podcast that one of his publishers, Repos Productions, encourages this strongly – suggesting it’s otherwise a waste of the back of cardboard. I happen to agree; this feature allows for varied play via selection or random options. I can only assume Walker-Harding is cooking up additional ports for expected expansions of the game. Heck, we designed a couple on the spot last time we played.

The Final Word on Imhotep

Imhotep is a well-designed, interesting game that I’m glad is on our shelves. I do think gamers will enjoy it more if they play the B variants or some combination of A and B. Some longtime players may feel like they have enough gateway games but, like Hanging Gardens, Carcassonne, Kingdom Builder and even Schacht’s own Zooloretto, it fills a useful spot in a collection. Imhotep is also good enough to delight experienced gamers who enjoy a super-filler with a 90’s euro feel.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Imhotep

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (P)lay It Now TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Press Release: Dized is an effortless way to learn board games

Press Release: Dized is an effortless way to learn board games

As the world of board games is expanding and becoming more versatile, one element hasn’t changed with the times the rulebook. To tackle this issue the Finnish publisher Playmore Games is releasing Dized, a smart device application that will be the friend at the table teaching you how to play board games.

Dized is an interactive tutorial app for board games, and with it players can start playing the games immediately out of the box. The tutorial keeps track of what the players have learned and teaches only relevant information. It also answers any questions players might have about the game.

“I personally can’t think of a more important concept for the board gaming industry right now. We’ve been planning Dized_logo_icon-300pxDized for two years now and gotten into full speed with the development this year. We have a dedicated software studio building the application and we’ve recruited several new team members for the project,” explains CEO Jouni Jussila. Players had the chance to see the application for the first time at the UK Games Expo in Birmingham in the first week of June. This preview version is built to host one board game, with more games to follow later on.

Dized will be crowdfunded later this year with the aim to develop the tools further so that any developers and publishers can build their own interactive tutorials.

“Our goal is that in a few years the library of tutorials in Dized will be so vast, that no matter which game you pick from your shelf, you can just skip the manual and start playing immediately. Just like in video games, in the future you will not need to read a manual to start playing”, says product manager Anna Lapinsh.

Players can try out the tutorials on their own iOS and Android devices later this year as a demo version will be released before Gen Con in August.

Playmore Games invites everyone to come check out Dized at booth A9 at the UK Games Expo to see the next board game revolution begin.

Further information: CEO Jouni Jussila, +358 46 9200 885
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Press Release: Play Your Own Path with Cardventures from Gamewright

Press Release: Play Your Own Path with Cardventures from Gamewright

New story-based line offers epic escapades & great solitaire literacy boosters

Newton, MA – Looking for an antidote to the “summer reading slide?” Gamewright has just the solution: Cardventures – a brand new series of games that play like interactive books where you control the story! Start each Cardventure by selecting a card and reading the narrative text. Then choose one of the options at the bottom, which leads to another card. Follow the story from card to card until you reach an end point. Then play again by choosing a different start card for an entirely new adventure!

Gamewright launches Cardventures with two titles: Stowaway 52 and Jump Ship! In Stowaway 52 you’ve snuck aboard an alien ship that’s about to attack Earth and it’s up to you to stop it. In Jump Ship! you take on the role of a pirate captain, leaping from ship to ship in search of treasure. Both titles not only make great parent-child “read together” activities but are also wonderful tools for luring back reluctant readers. They are a must-have for developing language and vocabulary, as well as enhancing decision making skills. Cardventures are for one or more players, ages 8+ and are available in stores now, with a suggested retail price of $9.99.

About Gamewright

Gamewright, a leading manufacturer of family games,is best known for such household hits as Slamwich,Rory’s Story Cubes®, Sushi Go!, Forbidden Island™, and the Scrambled States of America™ Game. Gamewright prides itself on making games that foster laughter, learning, friendship and fun. Kids, parents, grandparents, and educators all agree that Gamewright makes some of the best games on the planet. For more information, please visit www.gamewright.com.

Session Review: Bring Your Own Book from Matthew Moore and Luke Nalker and Gamewright Games

Session Review: Bring Your Own Book from Matthew Moore and Luke Nalker and Gamewright Games

Bring Your Own Book (subtitled “The Game of Borrowed Phrases”) had me at the title. As a voracious reader, I knew it was going to be a game that I’d enjoy. I wasn’t preparedBring Your Own Book for the game to play so well with our entire group, including some I’d describe as ‘non-readers’. It’s 2016 – what can you do? Although bibliophiles will embrace the game quicker, you need not be obsessed with books to enjoy it. Originally released as a self-published game, Gamewright has snapped it up. Thank goodness they did because it’s fun and we laughed a lot while playing.

Bring Your Own Book is amusing for the reason most party games are: you get to inject the personality of the people playing into the experience. On the surface, it’s a pretty straightforward. Like Apples to Apples, Dixit, and Cards Against Humanity, players submit an answer based on criteria set by a game card. That player selects their favorite option and awards the card to the player who selected it. The subjective selection of ‘good’ answers based on whose turn it is drives the mirth in these games. Bring Your Own Book is no exception here.

Yes, You Literally Bring Your Own Book

The innovation here: Instead of a hand of cards with possible answers, players arm themselves with a book. The book’s text is the source for their answers. Once the game card is read, players scour their books to find a phrase or line to match the card. Categories are all over the place, which is amusing. Some examples of the witty card selections: “A line from an unpublished Dr. Seuss book” “A pickup line” or “The title of a romance novel.”

One might read that description and think the game is more interesting for readers who pick their favorite book to use. Not so. The real fun comes out of the truly bizarre answers people try to pass off as a reasonable answer. I did well in our first game with a book on Irish history (I’m a mutt but more Irish/English than anything else). One of our players had a picture book about gnomes, which was a great source for ridiculous responses. Considering the card picker can select the winner based on their own criteria (funniest or the most appropriate for the category), going the funny route can often work and it almost did for the gnome book-wielder.

Bring Your Own Book

If you’re one of those folks who have moved on from deadtree books to the ebook world, you can still enjoy the game. While we had people raiding a few of our bookshelves, there’s no reason why players can’t just bring up a book on their Kindle or iPhone to use. Furthermore, you can get many free books online from your local library or online resources to use in a snap.

(Yes, BGB listeners who know me to be a total tech-head might ask about these bookshelves in my home. I do mostly read e-books but the deadtree variety are so cheap these days that sometimes, I just buy them instead…hey, I got this Morrissey biography for $.08 plus shipping!)

Oh, yeah – the winner is the first one to four or five cards. I think that’s it. Seriously, if you care about who wins, you’re missing the point of party games.

The Final Word on Bring Your Own Book

If you like this style of party game, you’re bound to enjoy Bring Your Own Book. While I love and admire clever party games like Codenames, games where you submit answers that rely on player relationships are the biggest source of laughs. The delightful bonus for Bring Your Own Book is how it allows players to get even more creative in their selections. Yes, it’s lower-effort creativity than the likes of Balderdash (another of my favorites), but it works. The game is now on our Top 10 Party Games list.

Bring Your Own Book plays in 20-30 minutes and with 3-8 players. Of course, you can control these factors by simply handing out more cards or increasing the threshold for winning. The packaging is also delightfully bookish, another fine detail for us book-lovers. I’m jazzed by the packaging Gamewright has been using, although my favorite has been the dice games boxes with the magnets you’ll find housing Qwixx, Dodge Dice and Rolling America. Not anymore – look at the cool addition to Bring Your Own Book just below. You track the books used to play the game as you go. What a terrific idea and one that is unique to Bring Your Own Book.

Bring Your Own Book

Bring Your Own Book is available now from Gamewright and you can follow the author here.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Bring Your Own Book

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: Copy provided by the publisher for independent review.

Session Review: Sushi Go Party! by Phil Walker-Harding and Gamewright Games

Session Review: Sushi Go Party! by Phil Walker-Harding and Gamewright Games

Don’t you hate it when a new edition of your favorite game comes out and the old one might as well go in the trash bin? Sushi Go Party will not do that to you. Fans will love the expanded version and they can easily recycle their previous copy by handing it to a friend as a great introduction to modern board games. That is, until the friend loves it so much that they upgrade to Sushi Go Party and pass the basic game on, too. The new version is that welcome and good.

Sushi Go For Beginners (skip this section, experts)

If you don’t know the original Sushi Go, where have you been? This inexpensive crowd-pleaser has enjoyably light Sushi Go Partygame play (plays in 20-30 minutes) and charming artwork sure to dazzle young and new-to-modern-game players. The game works incredibly well for that set, while serious gamers often like it as a filler.

Play is simple but interesting: players get a hand of cards, selecting and revealing one at a time, and then passing the hand to the left (a ‘pick and pass’ mechanism, as it is sometimes called). This is done until all cards are gone, which triggers scoring for the round. Points are awarded for sets that are collected and scored in unique ways for different cards (e.g., majority, multipliers, pairs, etc.) The game plays over three rounds, with building scores and a final bonus for dessert cards collected over the course of the game. The original game is enormous fun and so worth the cost of this small tin chock full of fun. But the new edition is even better.

Sushi Go Party Expands The Menu

Yes, it’s still Sushi Go but bringing the party means two key changes: more players and more variety. The new expanded version offers both in spades. Sushi Go Party plays up to eight – a very welcome feature – and combines the original game with the Dominion concept. Designer Phil Walker-Harding (whose SDJ-nominated Imhotep is all the rage right now) gives buyers of the big new tin a host of new cards in sets that you can mix and match for varied play.

In an inspired thematic choice, Walker-Harding has added ‘menus’ of card sets to play. Card types are now categorized as Rolls, Appetizers, Specials, and Desserts. Your custom bento box of card selection options (you can use a pre-made ones or build your own) are clearly shown with cardboard markers that sit in the center of the new score track. Hurray to that addition as well. No more score-keeping elsewhere on paper or scoring apps round to round.

Card and menu selections from each type can adjust the feel of the game for more interaction or to appeal to larger player counts. For example, there’s now a Spoon card that allows players to request a card from other player hands. There are also risky propositions with Eel and Tofu cards, which require players to have specific numbers of cards or earn a penalty. Additional desserts have been added and a distribution tweak that has more of these end-of-the-game cards rolling in each round makes these post-meal bonuses work better.

Sushi Go Party

The Final Word on Sushi Go Party

Like Sushi Go, Sushi Go Party plays quickly and it doesn’t take any longer to play with eight than it does with the original five player limit. In fact, the new edition even has improved rules to play the game well with only two players. My wife and I tried the new two-player version and it worked quite well. While it isn’t a game that I’d expect to transition so well (even the wondrous 7 Wonders is MUCH better as 7 Wonders: Duel than in in the two-player variant of the original), Walker-Harding has come up with a good way to handle things when you want Sushi For Two.

Sushi Go Party is an ideal upgrade to the original and an instant buy for fans of the game. Everyone who plays it with us says they want to buy it. The game is now on our must-include board game list for travel and big game parties. The US edition is out from Gamewright and you can see previews of many of the new cards on the designer’s Twitter feed.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Sushi Go Party

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: Copy provided by the publisher for independent review.

Session Review: Team Play from Johannes Schmidauer-König and Schmidt Spiele

Session Review: Team Play from Johannes Schmidauer-König and Schmidt Spiele

Team Play had significant buzz coming out of The Gathering of Friends 2016, seeming like it was this year’s Strike. Like Strike, which had been overlooked for a few years, GOF attendees seemed to have racked up multiple plays over the course of the event. While that’s not hard to do with shorter games, players obviously kept playing because they were having fun and I ordered a copy immediately. I was not disappointed.

While this quick-play Schmidt Spiele game from Johannes Schmidauer-König has a rummy feel with the draft-and-collect mechanism at its center, the game that came to mind on our first play it Take It or Leave It.  In both games, players draw variable goal cards and compile the means of fulfill them. While the latter does the job with dice, Team Play has players collect sets of cards and adds partnership to the mix.

Team Play Board Games

How Does Team Play…play?

Setup provides players with a single goal card and a variable number of hand cards, with the start player receiving one and the number increasing around the table. Then, players draw two cards each turn (draft-style from a three face-up cards and the deck) to collect cards that meet the requirements of private or one public goal card. Goal cards range in value from 1 to 6 points with more points awarded for harder sets of the same rank, runs, flushes – sometimes a combo of those elements. I admire the iconography on the cards, which I find easy to explain. Completing goals gives your team points, which is how you win.

The regular hand cards come in two colors (red and blue) and range in rank from 1 to 8, with three of each variation appearing in the deck. Each turn, you draw two, complete any goals you can from the cards in-hand (which are discarded). Then, you can pass one or two cards to your partner. While you are not allowed to discuss card passes, card-playing partners know how to do that with cards – both in actual passes and observation of your partner’s actions.  This is one of the elements that makes Team Play work so well. I’m pretty aggressive in my passing. If I don’t need it for the goal I’m working right now, off it goes to my partner. Who knows when it will be helpful?

The game ends when one team collects eight completed goal cards. While players only keep one goal card at a time, they have the option to discard the first one drawn. This is a key point since it helps players optimize their plans. I also like that you can rush the game by completing easier goals to put pressure on the other team. While this isn’t always possible, I like the strategy because it throws the over-thinkers off their guard. Those people need to move along so I always like when a game includes that option (particularly for fillers that are SUPPOSED TO BE fast).

Final Analysis of Team Play

We’re big fans of Team Play around here and it’s already hit the nickel list. While it has appealed to my family with the quick play time, partnership opportunity, and the simple but planning-friendly rules, we’ve also had enormous success showing it to other people. I see this becoming one of our opening fillers for a day of games or a lovely twenty-minute closer. While the game kind of made me yearn to get my own copy of Take It or Leave It (I played the Strategicon library copy), Team Play‘s compact box means it will probably remain the choice of these two when packing up for game day.

Boardgame Babylon Rating

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Dungeons and Dragons Makes An Appearance Inside Casinos

Dungeons and Dragons Makes An Appearance Inside Casinos

GUEST POST

Dungeons and Dragons has been an inspirational tabletop game for decades. The worldwide popularity of this fantasy game from E. Gary Gygax and David Arneson has allowed the game to branch out to other genres including popular video games, board games and arcade machines. Now, Dungeons and Dragons has inspired a whole new type of game: slot machines.

Konami Holdings Corporation, the company that makes amazing games for consoles has now released two slot machines themed to Dungeons and Dragons entitled, ‘Conquest and Treasures’ and ‘Enchanted Riches’. While many Hasbro board games have been used as the inspiration for slot machines in the past, this is the first time that a tabletop role-playing game has been used as a theme for slot machines.

Dungeons Dragons Casino
image credit: agbrief.com

“The players we see this day and age are out looking for entertainment, and there’s a lot of entertainment value in the new Dungeons & Dragons slot machines,” said Randy Reedy, Vice President of slot operations for Casino Valley View. “They really enjoy the experience. Just watching them, they get excited about additional bonuses within the free spin feature, which takes them to the progressive functionality. It’s very fun and interactive.”

Creating a slot machine that uses TV show icons such as characters from Star Trek, comic book heroes, and video game titles as themes has been an ongoing trend with both brick-and-mortar casinos and online gaming providers. Even cutesy themes are being used to attract players that have a taste for all things fluffy and pink, which is evident with titles such as Spin Genie’s uber popular, ‘Fluffy Favourites’. Konami hopes that their ‘Conquest and Treasures’ and ‘Enchanted Riches’ will not only engage fans of the tabletop game who are old enough to play in casinos but also patrons who appreciate groundbreaking graphics and animation.

Both slot machines will have a “4-level progressive” and “Xtra Reward” features, which are functions popularized by Konami. For people new to their games, Konami’s Xtra Reward and 4-level progressive are features that can be unlocked within the game. The 4-level progressive is like a video game’s optional quest where players can win big prizes, while Xtra Reward is a payout line that allows players to bet bigger and receive better prizes.

About the author:

Leo Smith has been an avid gamer since he was a child. A huge fan of Dungeons and Dragons, he also enjoys The Sims and Command and Conquer, among other titles.

Header image credit: ggrasia.com