Review: Thanos Rising by USAOPOLY

Review: Thanos Rising by USAOPOLY

Thanos Rising is a winning cooperative game for 2-4 players that has garnered BGB’s highest rating. Read on to learn more:

Gamers, both video gamers as well as board gamers, have been disappointed for so many years so many times when a great movie or TV show gets turned into a terrible play experience.

As somebody who worked in the video game industry for many years and made games for many Disney properties, I know that there are additional challenges that are faced when you have to work with a licensed product. Sometimes you don’t know the exact story and you still have to make a game anyway. At other times there are restrictions put into place by the IP holders. Yet sometimes it’s just a lazy publisher or designer figuring they don’t need to work that hard because the property is so popular. This happens A LOT, particularly with one publisher in particular.

Thank goodness this didn’t happen with USAopoly’s enjoyable, thematic Thanos Rising.

Thanos Rising
What’s the big deal, scrotum-chin? I’m holding them in my BARE HAND.

I don’t think I’m in the minority when I say that Avengers: Infinity War was a great cinematic experience. I’m baffled by the naysayers (presumably DC fanboys and people who just hate fun). I call myself a fan but not raging fan of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Some of the films are fantastic, others definitely fall short of that description. I was never a serious comic book reader but I’m impressed with the way Marvel has put out fairly consistent films in the last 10 years and Infinity War is probably the best of the lot. So I came to this game wanting to enjoy it and, frankly, a little fearful that it would fall short. I’m glad to say that didn’t happen.

Taking on the Mad Titan

Thanos Rising is a cooperative game that plays in about 45 minutes with 2 to 4 players playing on a three space board around an awesome Thanos statue. Players take on the role of a leading Marvel character who’s responsible for gathering at team of heroes and defeating villains (your pick of Captain America, Black Panther, Gamora or Dr. Strange). Thanos himself is far too powerful to actually defeat so you aren’t going to be asked to actually take down the mad titan in the game. Instead, you win the game by defeating seven or more of his villains while working to save and recruit other heroes to your team.

Thanos Rising

That’s the only way to win the game, but there are three different ways you can lose. First, Thanos can defeat 10 heroes in the game with his strikes that happen before each player around. Two, he can defeat any one of the players entirely by wiping out their team. Lastly, he can collect all six of the Infinity Stones. I am fond of the deep theming here and how it adds tension to the game.

Roll For The Multiverse

The narrative of the game is created through a series of die rolls each turn, in the style of many cooperative games where the players and the game each get a turn. In Thanos Rising, the big purple baddie goes first, with two die rolls determining his progress on collection of an Infinity Stone and some other element. For the stones, he needs to roll that same one five times and then he gets the stone, making future rolls for that stone cause grief for the heroes. The latter die has him an attack heroes, activate villains or make another step towards acquiring a stone.

Player turns are quick but provide simple options about how to contain Thanos. You deploy to one of the places on the board and then get your own dice to roll and act. You begin with a few dice depending on your character and you can improve your dice pool by acquiring other heroes. In this way, the game borrows a bit from Quarriors, a game I thought was a good idea that never really worked as well as I would have liked. To acquire a hero, you need to roll the right icons on your dice.

We Have A Hulk

Bigger heroes like the Hulk or Iron Man are tougher than pushovers like Hawkeye, so it behooves you to acquire the easier ones first. With three cards in each vector, there is bound to be someone who can help, especially since many of the characters are complementary. This is maybe the heart of the design working; USAopoly’s design team didn’t cop out and just say, “They’ll want to acquire Black Widow because Scarlett Johansson is on the card.” Instead, they made the abilities make sense for the character. This is not too much to ask, but it is often overlooked by lazy people who spend a lot of money on licensed games.

Back to it – so, if you recruit heroes, they add to your team in the future, offering you their special ability. These can range from extra dice to special powers to affect the collection of the Infinity Stones. It is definitely worth adding to your team and discussing with the other players which hero should join which team.

There is another reason to recruit heroes. When Thanos hits a vector, he hits all the heroes there waiting to be recruited. If they die, they are out of the game and that helps Thanos win. If you recruit damaged villains, you get them back at full power. Thus, it makes sense to let them take a little fire and then pull them out before they are defeated…if you can do it. I really like this factor that makes you take chances with the heroes’ lives.

Say Goodbye To The Villains

The other main option is to defeat villains from Thanos’ team (since you can’t just knock Thanos Risingout the guy himself). Similar to the way you recruit, you use your dice to roll enough to defeat the villains. Some are generic villains you can knock off with one or two rolls. Others need enough firepower that you had better recruit some help before you go. There is a very real gameplay reason to defeat them, too. When they activate, their abilities range from annoying to devastating. So, that element may play into which ones you target. You also get bonus tokens when beating villains, which helps motivate their defeat (against endlessly adding to your team).

As I said, this is also how you win the game and you can set the difficulty of the game for between 7 and 10 villains to defeat to win. Experienced gamers will want to set it high for a real challenge. I like the easy variability of that setting, which calls back to Pandemic, one of the classics in the genre of cooperative games.

We have played Thanos Rising a half dozen times and it has been tense and fun each play. The richness of the character collection weighing against the villains containment and the stone gathering is just right for a game that plays in 45 minutes. Like the best thematic games from films (looking at you, Star Wars: Rebellion), Thanos Rising unfolds like your own version of a story you enjoyed. We expect to play it for many years to come.

End Game

Look, if you are a Warner Brothers apologist that tries to convince your friends that the DC movies aren’t THAT bad just because Gal Godot is magnificent as Wonder Woman (she really is), you may not like Thanos Rising for reasons that have nothing to do with this very fine game.

But if you’re one of the zillions who loved Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War, this is a worthy addition to your game collection. Thanos Rising is snappy cooperative game that will engage with both theme and nice design touches that keep the game clean. This is on a shelf with go-to games this year. I expect it to make my dime list for sure.

The components are solid, with quality cards and all but it is that massive, cool Thanos figure that makes this production. We love it so much, it’s on a coveted shelf in our game library.

Thanos Rising

Thanos Rising has been a huge hit with our gaming group, from casual gamers to serious folks that saw it as a pleasant super-filler. The game has staying power, I’m sure. Here’s hoping that USA-opoly gives us an expansion when Avengers: End Game comes out.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Thanos Rising

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (P)lay It Now TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

5 Quick Questions about Raccoon Tycoon with Glenn Drover

5 Quick Questions about Raccoon Tycoon with Glenn Drover

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s an interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR. Let’s see how Glenn Drover, the legendary designer of hot new game Raccoon Tycoon (published by Forbidden Games), shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Raccoon Tycoon?

Glenn: Raccoon Tycoon is an easy to learn (and teach) game of commodity speculation, auctions, set-collection, and tableau building set in the gilded age in Astoria (a land of anthropomorphic animals). The artwork by Annie Stegg is insanely beautiful, and together with the shallow learning curve makes the game appealing to a wide demographic: families and non-gamers, while the multiple strategies and challenging decisions will make it appealing to core gamers.

BGBMaking games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Glenn: My wife finally played Catan with friends last year and hated it. This shocked me, so I asked her why. She told me that she was frustrated by having to wait for her turn, and then often not being able to do much or anything if her numbers didn’t come up. That night I decided to design a game that would appeal to Catan fans (Gateway à Gamers) with commodities, low luck, and where you could ALWAYS do something interesting on your turn. Raccoon Tycoon was born.

BGBThere are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Glenn: The game that you will play with non-gamers or casual gamers who you want to bring into the gaming world…or anyone who likes Catan or Ticket to Ride and is ready for the next great Gateway Game.

Raccoon Tycoon
Editor’s Note: I have never heard of this publication.

BGBThis is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Glenn: It used to have a really annoying mechanic where you had to draw a bunch of cubes every turn to change the price and supply in the market. Dan Vujovic suggested that a card mechanic would be cleaner. After months of resistance (I really like the perfect supply/demand impact of the cube draw), I relented and created the Price/Production cards that drive the market now. They not only worked better, they gave the player another interesting (and sometimes agonizing) decision.

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Raccoon Tycoon! Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Glenn: Time: 60 – 90 minutes, Players: 2 – 5, Learning Curve: 2/5, Strategy: 4/5

Joke

What’s the difference between a dead Raccoon in the road and a run over copy of Monopoly?
A: There are skid marks in front of the Raccoon.

The game is now LIVE on Kickstarter

Good Men: A tribute to my father, Robert Leo Burgess

Good Men: A tribute to my father, Robert Leo Burgess

2018 got off to a rough start for me, as I spent a lot of January with family concerns. My father’s health failed and my mother is also dealing with issues. At the end of the month, I lost my father to long illness and I wrote this note about him on Facebook. I heard from a few people that they had shared it because my note on Facebook about the wonderful father I was honored to have seems like it inspired some good discussions and consideration about what it means to be a father. I’ve slightly edited it to remove some personal points that are not as relevant to the casual reader, but kept what I think was the heart of the piece.


January 30, 2018 – Late Sunday night, as I was watching a Netflix film about funny people and trying not to think about what was imminent, my father passed away after a brief time in hospice.

I have been uncharacteristically silent on social media because I am still processing the loss, which I can only do with words. There was further delay from a paper cut on my right index finger that I gained while filling out the paperwork to release his body for cremation just moments after I arrived at the hospice. I was first to arrive, had driven over in a haze and, at that moment, appreciated the sharp pain of the cut popping my consciousness back into place before I went in to see my dad one last time.

As I sit here in the dark of morning a day later, I am thinking one could say that my father was not a great man. Great men change the whole world in some way. Maybe it’s how business runs in a particular space, how we think about something important or even how we view change and evolution in a broader sense. What I do know about great men, as I’ve known a few, is that they make sacrifices for their greatness and for whatever cause that matters more than anything to them.

That wasn’t my dad. He was a good man.

Good men attend to everything across their lives at some level from acceptably to amazingly. They love their families, they work hard to get educated and then at a job to make sure, as they say, the ends meet. They are far from perfect but their desire to make sure everything across life happens well enough is admirable because they don’t believe in kids getting ignored for a job or constantly needing to be off in their man cave or out with buddies to pretend they don’t have family obligations in real life. Good men make room in their lives for their spouse and their children; the best of them give their family an outsized space.

The good men find balance. They shift gears when the family is formed. They might even seem a bit boring, at times. But, good and boring pays the bills. Good and boring shows up to their children’s recital. And good and boring leaves a legacy of loving memories and kids who adore them.

And, if you knew him at all, how could you not adore my dad? If you found a way, well, too bad for you. The rest of us were crazy about him.

Robert Leo Burgess was born on December 7, 1933, a while before that date was Pearl Harbor Day. The youngest of nine kids, he was shorter than all of the men in the family, which he often attributed to there ‘being nothing left’ when he finally came around. As the baby of the family, he was very loved and received a lot of attention. I feel confident that my father’s passionate commitment to our immediate family came from the constant support and love he got from his own mother and siblings, who might have been compensating for my grandfather being less than affectionate.

Dad was a bruiser and a tough guy all his life, but it manifested much differently later because he was gregarious almost to a fault. He could walk into a room with ten people and they were all his friends before he left it. Now, if you’re reading this, you probably know what it is like to be in a conversation with a Burgess. We talk and talk…sometimes you’d think we just like to hear our own voices (yes, they do sound good), but, really, we like telling stories.

In my dad’s generation, I often say the nuance in the stories and their purpose changes from sibling to sibling. My dad focused on the funny. He was far more likely to tell you a joke than a story. He was always fond of them but, after his stroke a decade ago, he became a veritable sit-down comedian. Everyone nearby was subjected to them and he left most of the many, many hospitals since his stroke with nurses sorry to see him go because he kept them laughing and always had a positive attitude. It could be a problem, though. When we’d tell him, “Dad, that waiter kind of needs to actually go put in the order,” he’d say, “It’s good for his health! I’m helping him!” No one was safe from his laugh therapy. I tried to give him new joke books every year but he stuck to the old faithfuls most of the time, including one-liners that would make Henny Youngman proud. As he became increasingly difficult to understand, it wasn’t hard to listen for the moment when he was going to laugh so you could laugh along with him at the right moment.

My father’s major passion in middle life to late life was reading. He took a speed reading course as a younger man and never lost it. When I was young, he took the bus to his office in East L.A., reading on the way there and back, plus he’d hit the pages during two tea breaks in the morning and afternoon and also at lunch. With that, he’d polish off close to two books a day. Of course, these were not studies on neuroscience or impenetrable postmodern novels; his interest was in mysteries and biographies of pop culture icons. He also had zero interest in retaining those yellowed paperbacks like talismans of accomplishment – he was constantly moving the books he’d read out for the next batch and watching like an addict for the next library sale where books were a buck a bag. In the last year, I was his dealer, hitting all the library sales and used bookshops to round up enough books to keep him reading all day, every day. My Saturday morning ritual was to show him the books I’d gathered all morning in hopes that I’d get approval for more than 50% of them. I succeeded most of the time.

Among the lighter reading, he’d find time for some of his favorite literary authors and I’d bring them over for a re-read. He had an affinity for authors who seemed to write the same book over and over again – Bukowski, Kerouac (on whom we disagreed), Fitzgerald (on whom we agreed), and Thomas Wolfe – his favorite writer. Something about Wolfe appealed to my dad – maybe the overwhelming emotion in his prose, the questing real-life narratives, or the grandiose diction. Whatever the case, he delighted in Wolfe’s work and life, often repeating biographical details like Wolfe’s tendency to write while leaning against his refrigerator or how he died from TB after contracting it from a hobo he met when he jumped a train. A complete collection of Wolfe’s work is among the slim library my dad retained on his small shelves.

His other passion was the silver screen. He was an avid film lover and moviegoer. But he didn’t travel with film into the modern day. His love for moving pictures remained largely in the black-and-white. As a young man, he worked at a movie theater for some time and all those free movies might have developed the habit. He did love to talk about films and one of our rituals for ages was watching Siskel and Ebert in their various formats on Sunday evenings before dinner. Yet, huge swathes of film, and even music were unavailable to him because he didn’t like the performer. All those biographies gave him details about actors, singers, and directors that were lousy to their families, their wives, or their colleagues. After that, he wouldn’t want to see anything with that person involved. I used to tease him about it – “Who cares if Robert De Niro is a jerk? Raging Bull is amazing.” He wouldn’t budge. Even this last Christmas, he reminded me when he heard a Bing Crosby song on our playlist that the performer was ‘a terrible parent.’ Now, I realize this was just an extension of my dad’s goodness; he didn’t want even exceptional art if it came from bad people.

My dad’s passion for the written word on the page and on the screen inspired my own. Despite my love of technology, I followed in his footsteps and studied literature in college. It worked out in the career I have chosen that blends our great loves. While I tell stories in software more often than I do in prose, there is still the structure and the passion to tell a tale that will enlighten, inspire and enrich the life of the reader, here a user. That came from my dad.

The games came from him, too. Dad was a poker and cribbage player but mostly because of the society of play. Winning meant nothing to him; he craved card play for the chance to interact. When I was young, the monthly poker games my Dad attended was a highlight. Most of the attendees were family, my uncles and older cousins made up the bulk of the group, but some old friends of theirs often rounded out the table of freewheeling dealer’s choice. Yes, it was nice to play but it was mostly about the conversation. Dad played so he could tell and hear jokes, share family news, and spend time with his favorite buddies. The poker nights were an excuse to stay connected with family and friends. I see that in my own board gameplay now, that desire to hold on to my closest friends through regular sessions, keeping the creation of precious hours in regular production.

My cribbage memories are mostly of just the two of us playing. He was an incredibly generous player. He’d call ‘muggins’ if you missed points in your hand, but he’d give them to you anyway. This was a reaction to his own father who was notorious in the family for cheating. He’d back-peg and do all kinds of questionable stuff against even his own kids. I’m glad that what my dad learned from that is what NOT to do. I’ve learned well from his example here.

As we have lost so many of my dad’s generation in the family recently, I’ve often thought about how to distinguish the Burgessness of them all. Yes, that’s a word; it needed invention for that last sentence to work. My generation, of which I’m the youngest, know what I mean. There was a powerful sense of Burgessness throughout them all.

What was my dad best at? Sure, there was the humor I spoke about. Yet, there was also a sense of compassion in him that I admired. As the youngest of his family’s generation, I would like to think he was among the most modern with regard to accepting others. If the decades of time in social work taught him one thing, it was compassion for his fellow man and woman. My dad spent a lot of time with people who were facing the worst days of their lives. He had a positive spirit in his heart at all times so he could console, he could inspire, he could help. While neither of us had much use for organized religion, our Catholic upbringing did instill a concern for the weakest in society, which we both extended to tolerance. He believed in the common good and that America was about all people, not just your own tribe. Dad championed the underdog and the weak like all heroes do. I will always admire him for his lack of cynicism and interest in seeing real action over words.

As a father, he was devoted to making sure we had what we needed. He made sacrifices, neglected to have much of any kind of a mid-life crisis – other than briefly listening to more Willie Nelson and Jim Croce than was generally advisable – and was true to our family and his wife. He was not handy around the house; Dad couldn’t change a light bulb. He was certainly no gourmet unless you consider a predilection for peanut butter and butter sandwiches, or Velveeta on graham crackers to be avant-garde in some way. He blew the Santa thing by walking into the house with an Atari 2600 under his arm from Clarks Drugs when I was a kid, but at least he brought the thing home, despite an irrational fear of anything electronic. He didn’t drink, except for the occasional pina colada (of which I’d get a sip!), and never smoked because his own father had shortened his life with both of those vices. His kids are the same way as a result.

Dad would always drive you where you needed to go, pick you up when you were in a bind, help, throw money at a problem (what is money for, anyway?), and console you when things went wrong. Dad was always okay with your mistakes; he was there to help clean them up and get you back on track. Dad was exceptionally good at being supportive and not throwing something in your face when you failed because you didn’t listen to his advice. He never said ‘I told you so,” never wanted to “teach people a lesson”, never wanted to make it hard on someone when they were already down. He was a supervisor at work and I can remember how hard the employees fought to be on his team – they told me so without asking. They knew he was the kind of leader who worked with you and offered guidance, not the kind who obsessed on hierarchy. The masses at his retirement party years later spoke volumes; he was much-loved at work, too.

Dad never made us feel like we were not good enough, that his love had any strings, that his judgment was against us. He was generous with compliments, acknowledged the good things, and praised like no other. Even in the last days before he became largely incoherent, he was telling us we ‘were the best’, expressed his love for us, and talked about how wonderful his grandchildren were. He spoke this way to everyone. He saw value in spreading positivity as often as possible, and in every situation.

Dad stopped walking about a year ago and for most of that time, he was at a board-and-care facility just across the street from my house. I loved the fact that I could look out my front window when I got home from work and see if his light was on to know if I could visit. It was easy to slip over there; the people who ran the place knew me well enough that I didn’t need to sign in. Dad would always be happy to see me. His mind would start clouded and he’d need to get some ideas out of the way; he’d often start mid-sentence as if I’d walked in on a conversation he was already having, talking about the book he’d just read or some detail that was important enough that he returned to it with some frequency (like his brief time on the set of “Touch of Evil” or when he and I met Harlan Ellison, who tried to convince him to kick me out of the house when I commented on Ellison’s car commercials of the time). But once you got past those anecdotes that were sitting on top of his consciousness, you could really talk to him. We had so many good chats about what was going on these days (of course he hates Trump – he’s an awful person) and how the kids are doing (he would cry from joy when we discussed my son’s Eagle Scout rank or my daughter’s exceptional talent as a singer). He hasn’t been at full cognitive power for more than a decade, but he didn’t lose his sense of justice nor his deep love of his family.

I’ve had twenty years to get used to the fact that I would lose my dad one day. In 1998, he had bypass surgery and, in short order, was diagnosed with prostate cancer. I thought I was going to lose him then. But he recovered. Then, the stroke hit in 2007 and again, I thought I was going to lose my dad. But he recovered. Seizures, minor strokes (perhaps) and an endless number of falls occurred in the next decade. We went to the ER a lot, each time prepared for the worst. But he recovered somehow again and again. We have had so many extra years to consider that we might lose him, which gave me a ton of time to express my appreciation for him. He met all of that with love. After his stroke, he often couldn’t contain his emotions so I would do my best to express my love with a laugh so he could laugh, too. It worked most of the time.

For me, this was all ‘bonus time.’ I am so grateful for every day of it.

Last Wednesday was the last day when Dad and I communicated directly. After the doctor called me and let me know he recommended that we let Dad enter hospice, I drove out to the hospital and woke him up. He recognized me by my voice, heard me tell him how much I loved him and responded with the same. He could no longer intake water so I used swabs to soothe him a bit, as I had done with my Uncle Bill just six months before. I was reminded to take that moment to express what I needed to, as I had with Uncle Bill. With Dad, though, I remembered how often I’d repeated what I wanted to say. He knew how much I loved him and appreciated him. He loved how I told him that his brother Bill had added to my personality as much as he had. He loved that I acknowledged my Uncle Ed as a similar inspiration in my life. He thought the world of them both and told me I was smart to not just learn from him because he’d done the same and learned so much from his brothers and sisters, even more than from his own father. We understood each other well. I didn’t have to say it all again. I just had to hug him and hold his hand and tell him I loved him.

So, I’m going to revise my earlier statement. My dad was a great man to the people in his life, to the people he helped and befriended – who are legion – and the people who he loved so much. He neglected being great for the world so he could be greater for all of us, those who knew him and, inevitably, loved him.

PRESS RELEASE: Renegade Games Introduces Fireworks!

PRESS RELEASE: Renegade Games Introduces Fireworks!
San Diego, CA (June 14th, 2018) — Renegade Game Studios™ is excited to announce the next explosive addition to their catalog — Fireworks! This will be the fifth dexterity game in the Renegade catalog by Aza-Chen, designer of other adorably fun games such as Kitty PawDoggy Go!Shiba Inu House, and Circus Puppy. You can find this title on game shelves in beginning September 2018. Pre-order from the Friendly Local Game Store now or through the Renegade Store for Essen Pick-up!

A group of cats has been training very hard to master their profession — shooting off the biggest and best fireworks in the world! Although they are still rookies, they hope to become experts someday. Which cat can put on the most explosive fireworks display?

The goal is to collect Fireworks Tiles and arrange them on your City Board to create stunning displays. On your turn, you launch the Fireworks Die out of the barrel and into the box. You then take some face-up Fireworks Tiles from the box and place them on your city board. The game end is triggered when a player fills up their entire City Board. Whoever has the most valuable fireworks display wins!

Features:

  • Launch the Fireworks Die into the City
  • Create the most beautiful night sky
  • Action cards add silly rules for even more fun
  • Play with Advanced or Speed Variants
  • Purr-fect for 2-4 kitties ages 6+ to play in about 20 minutes

Quick Facts
MSRP: $25.00
SKU: RGS0823
North America Release Date: September
Game Type: Dexterity

READ THE RULEBOOK!

About Renegade Game Studios:
Renegade Game Studios is a premier developer and publisher of original award winning board games, including Overlight, Clank!: A Deck-Building Adventure, Lanterns: The Harvest Festival, and The Fox in the Forest. Our mission is to publish games that are fun, challenging, and unique.  We believe that gaming is for everybody and that everybody is a gamer; you just have to find the right game!

Find out more at www.renegadegames.com

PRESS RELEASE: NO LIMIT GAMES PRESENTS BATTLE OF SOULS

PRESS RELEASE: NO LIMIT GAMES PRESENTS BATTLE OF SOULS

NO LIMITS, INC PRESENTS BATTLE OF SOULS, AN EXTENSIBLE CARD GAME

May 29th, Los Angeles, CA – Battle of Souls is an action-packed card battle game that combines what is great about the deck-building genre without being locked into starter decks or randomized booster packs. Why should collectors that can afford better cards dominate games? Battle of Souls equalizes the playing field and injects the purity of deck building strategy back into the game. Choose from a multitude of legendary historical warriors and pit them against one another in a battle of souls!

No Limit Games came up with the vision for Battle of Souls card game in 2015. The premise was to create the same feeling you gained from a standard “trading card game” but without the “pay to win” mechanism. Much like the game Othello, we wanted a play style that was challenging, easy to learn, has great replayability, and was fun without having to hunt down rare cards.

While we understand and appreciate that aspect of the trading card game market, we also felt there was an alternative approach that was lacking. Battle of Souls’ major selling point is that there are no starter decks, pre-constructed decks, or randomized booster packs. In some games, players that cannot afford to buy the expensive rare cards have a hard time playing against players with decks worth several hundred dollars. Battle of Souls’ concept is to remove the need to purchase overpriced single cards and hundreds of randomized booster packs with
hopes of getting the rare items they need in order to compete. Instead, with Battle of Souls, each set box that a player gets will contain all of the cards for that specific warrior group. Our game will be focused on the players’ deck building skills instead of how much money they put into the deck.

Playing the game is simple. Build your 40-60 card deck using no more then 4 copies of any single card and no more then 3 legendary warriors. Shuffle and start playing. In the game you have 7 types of cards: “Fighters” – Warrior, Elite Warrior, Warlord, & Legendary Warrior. “Support” – Tactics, Equipment, Battlefield.

The Warrior class cards don’t require anything special to play them. You can deploy one fighter per turn. When your warrior gets 3 kills then you can sacrifice it for an Elite Warrior. After 5 kills on your Elite Warrior you can sacrifice it for a Warlord. After 7 kills on your Warlord, you can sacrifice it, plus an Elite Warrior and a Warrior for a Legendary Warrior. Equipment and tactic cards can be played as many as you desire per turn, (up to 6 can be active at the same time). Lastly only one battlefield can be active on the entire field.

From our initial idea to the game we have today has been a process of refining through playtesting and feedback at numerous in-stores and conventions. Our goal was to have the game be focused on the player’s deckbuilding skills as opposed to how much money they have to build the perfect deck. We think we have met that goal.

This game was also shown on the Boardgame Babylon YouTube Channel:

The Kickstarter launched on May 29th, 2018. It will run for 40 days, ending on Sunday July 8th, 2018 with a goal of $11,000. The rewards each include our deluxe box that contains both Samurai and Viking sets in one box.

PREVIEW: Sparkle*Kitty Nights from Breaking Games is now live on Kickstarter

PREVIEW: Sparkle*Kitty Nights from Breaking Games is now live on Kickstarter

Sparkle*Kitty Nights is a funny party-style game that plays in 25-30 minutes and contains NSFW content.

A few months back, I played Sparkle*Kitty with my family for the first time and we had some great laughs from the simple fact that the game makes you say silly things. I recall thinking at the time that the main mechanism of the game being the recitation of words meant an ‘adult’ version with naughty stuff was going to come out.

Well, it’s here. Sparkle*Kitty Nights has pretty much the same game play that you see in the original, kid-friendly version of the game. Players need to clear their hand of cards to win by saying funny things. The cool princesses have been replaced by knights, but they are still female and now have suggestive names to amp up the amusement. To play cards from your hand, you cast spells (that’s when you say the words) by dropping a card on one that matches the color or icon of the cards on the central tableau. once you get through your hand, you’re able to draw from the tower from which you are escaping and then refilling to five cards. Some cards let you skip the hand-emptying and directly replenish your hand from the tower in your race to get out. SKN adds a cooperative element for more players and a few new concepts, but the rules are pretty much the same as the original game.

Sparkle*Kitty Nights

And, yes, here the words in the deck just beg to come together in ways that suggest all kinds of innuendo. We played the game at the Gathering of Friends earlier this month and had people coming up to see what we were doing because we kept ‘casting spells’ that made people wonder and want to know what was going on because we were laughing so heartily.

Sparkle*Kitty was lauded by many for the girl power of self-rescuing princesses. Sparkle*Kitty Nights doesn’t have that kind of agenda – it’s just pure fun times saying silly stuff with your friends. If you hear the basic rules and think, “there isn’t much here,” you’re missing the point. SKN is one of those games where it isn’t about the mechanisms (although the hand management is handled intelligently). It’s about the reaction you get from the people in the game. This was designed to an experience: The fun of laughing with friends as you say funky-weird stuff in an order dictated by the game. What could be better for a night in with friends who like a little suggestive humor?

As a word nerd, Sparkle*Kitty immediately appealed to me and the Nights version will probably get a little more play as an end of the night bit of amusement that doesn’t get as outlandish as Cards Against Humanity, but is more consistently amusing than Codenames: Deep Undercover.

Want to hear more about Sparkle*Kitty Nights? This video review online will give you the deets in motion:

Sparkle*Kitty Nights is live on Kickstarter and is suggestive enough to be for ages 18 and up. But adults with a sense of humor that doesn’t mind the naughty should get a kick out of it.

PRESS RELEASE: Gorilla Games launches Kickstarter of “Love and Hate” metagame

4/26/18, Los Angeles: Jeff Siadek of Gorilla Games launches kickstarter of “Love and Hate” metagame

“Love and Hate” is a new kind of game that you play on top of another game.

It is only 18 cards and a single page of rules and takes almost no time to play but it adds a social depth to any game you play along with it.

In “Love and Hate”, you get a secret love and a secret hate card. At the end of the other game you are playing, you count up the points and declare a winner. The winner of “Love and Hate” is determined by adding your secret love’s score to your own and subtracting the score of your secret hate. The rulesheet has rules for loving or hating the same person or yourself to cover any contingency the randomness of the cards brings.

Here are a few examples of how “Love and Hate” can add a new social dimension to other games. I chose the top 10 games on Boardgamegeek.com to see how they would work with “Love and Hate”. Please note that my use of these games is not intended to imply an actual connection with or endorsement by the publishers or designers of those games.

Gloomhaven and Pandemic are cooperative so they shouldn’t work directly with Love and Hate. However, you could count up Earned XP and Gold as a sort of “score” for Gloomhaven and see how the inter-party struggles heated up during your session.

Twilight Struggle, 7 Wonders Duel and Star Wars: Rebellion are all essentially 2 player games so there isn’t room for the nuanced infighting that “Love and Hate” brings to the table.

Through the Ages, Terraforming Mars, Scythe, Terra Mystica, and Great Western Trail all count victory points so they should play well with Love and Hate.  That is about half the games currently on the top 10 of boardgamegeek.  I am not as familiar with Great Western Trail or Through the Ages so I’ll focus on the other three but remember that anywhere there are VPs you can count them!

Terraforming Mars has a limited range of direct attack cards but “Love and Hate” could really shine in the building of greenery. You can build your cities near those of your secret love and the greenery tiles between them count for both of you. You can also make choices about bonuses to pursue based on your secret cards.

Terra Mystica is a classic area control game. Being able to trust your neighbor means you can spend more effort on building and less on defense. Of course, that neighbor might actually hate you and be lulling you into a sense of complacency.

Scythe lets you score for combat so why not choose to beat on your secret hate? There is no shortage of opportunity to score while you drive down your opponent. You can still score for battling those you don’t officially hate or even your secret love if a tactical opportunity arises.

The point of all this is that games are about more than just points. They are about the stories that we create as we bring these games to life. As the gods of these simple worlds, we animate them and breathe life into them. “Love and Hate” gives us another set of tools to express ourselves. It creates a web of relationships that adds another social dimension to the games we are already loving.

I happened to have a few card slots left on a print run of another game so I implemented this little gem. It is strangely apropos that “Love and Hate” was an add-on to another print run. Let’s hope you can love and hate it along with your favorite games.

The one week Kickstarter for Love and Hate will end on Thursday May 3rd. This is a unique game and it isn’t packaged to sell through distribution so please pick up your copy from the limited print run while you can.

BGB at Gathering of Friends 2018

BGB at Gathering of Friends 2018

The Gathering of Friends remains a highlight of my gaming year. The trip to Niagara Falls (the US side) is worth it in order to get an early look at many games that the world will see later in the year at Spiel. As it happens, many games I really wanted to see last year were off the radar due to my intense last six months of life and work getting in the way of games. What can you do?

GOF for me this year was affected by a commitment to playtest a Legacy game that meant I would be playing a long series of the same game. I cannot comment on the game but I will say that it was certainly excellent and one people will be thrilled to see when it finally sees the light of day. I also happily had a chance to playtest both of my front-burner games: Theme Park and Cosplay Showdown (recently renamed).

What follows is a brief list of played games that I had a chance to try out (part 1):

Keyflow

Richard Breese’s excellent card game version of his hit game, Keyflower, is a prototype I sought out after recommendations from many other people at the Gathering. The various mechanisms that made Keyflower so popular are there, including the ability to use a building built by others, different worker types, and the farmland expansion theme. Many elements of the original are simply boiled down into cards instead of a map, Breese has made a lighter take on the game’s place-and-upgrade concept. While the theme doesn’t engage me particularly, I like the mechanisms and look forward to playing it more when it arrives later in the year. Richard said it is scheduled for a Spiel 2018 release. As you can see below, I was not alone in my appreciate for his latest game.

The Mind

If there was a game of the convention, it was The Mind. This ridiculously simple concept takes The Game and amps up the experience by providing players with a more open play style. You need to ‘read the mind’ of the other players to play your cards that go from 1-100 in ascending order during the game. Beginning with one card and scaling up from there depending on the number of players, you need to simply drop the cards in the right order into the pile in the middle of the table. There are no turns; you just decide if you’re the one with the next highest card to play.

The only thing is: Your only clues to determine whether you should play are the non-verbal cues of your fellow players. No words or real signs are to be passed, but you find ways. While I played the game with many people, I seemed to do best with Richard Breese and Rik Van Horn, although we lost on Level 6. Playing with my buddy Jeff was pretty solid as well, but you never know whose brainwaves might work best.

If you get into a bind, there are shuriken stars that can be used to force everyone to discard their lowest card. To ‘throw one,’ all players must raise their hands in unison, agreeing that they do not have confidence in their next play. This both gets you out of the bind and gives you a sense of the lay of the land with the remaining player hands.

If you fail to collectively play the cards in consecutive order, you lose a glowing ghost bunny card – which is somehow ‘a life.’ Yes, some of those sentences had odd moments, didn’t they? The theme of The Mind appears to involve incorporeal rabbit ninjas. I don’t understand it either but the game is a winner and it was in constant play at the Gathering. It’s due out from Pandasaurus Games soon and it will be a hot item. Pre-order now!

Transatlantic

A new-to-me game that I wanted to play since this came out at Spiel in 2017, I Gathering of Friends 2018expected to like it because Concordia from designer Mac Gerdts is one of my favorite recent games. This one takes much of the feel of his previous game and changes the theme to be ships in the transition from the age of sail to the age of steam. There’s still this vaguely deck-building thing going on, but it’s suppressed even further by less frequent opportunities to add to your options. Instead, you buy ships based on their age, speed, cargo capacity, and tonnage.

These elements help you place the ships into service on certain ocean boards, which can only contain three ships at a time. When ships sail (some of the deck cards lets you do this), you get cash. When they are inevitably pushed out of the sea by newer, better ships, you score the ships based on your investment in that type of ship, with bonuses based on previously retired ships in that category. The various cards give you powers to optimize, break and manipulate rules as you acquire ships, sometimes providing a little money to opponents when you call for all ships in an ocean to sale, and plan for their eventual trip to the scrap heap after a few coal-driven voyages.

This may seem like a lot but it is maybe even lighter than Concordia in some ways. The concepts of the Prefect, Diplomat and the like are present in this buy, ship and invest game but I enjoyed how Gerdts reimplemented many of them into similar ideas to keep the feel of Concordia without just duplicating it. I liked Transatlantic quite a bit and expect to acquire it in the days ahead.

Merlin

This collaboration from the reliable Stefan Feld and the similarly so
Michael Rieneck is a solid middleweight euro with an enjoyably integrated theme Gathering of Friends 2018that shines in the components and some mechanisms. Players use a kind of rondel to acquire items and enact actions, using dice that command how far you can move. In addition to your ‘knight’ dice that only let your pawn move clockwise around the Round Table Rondel (which kind of reminds me of Burgen Land), you also get a Merlin die each turn that lets you move clockwise or counter so. But he’s a neutral pawn so timing your move is an issue if others are out to take their turn first. This works well and you play it over the course of six rounds, with attacks from brigands and such happening every other turn (like so many Feld ‘punishment’ mechanisms). Publisher Queen’s production quality helps, too, with flag, staff and shield tokens looking good. While there are many things going, this is Feld in approachable mode like Notre Dame. While not everyone likes Stefan Feld’s ‘point salads’ (as we call now derisively reference what we used to lovingly call ‘multiple paths to victory’), the ones that successfully blend the flavors win me over big time (Castles of Burgundy does, Luna does not). I’d called Merlin a solid entry into his ludography. I don’t need to buy it right away but I’d probably trade to get it and explore the system more.

Gathering of Friends 2018

 

Karuba: The Card Game

The SDJ nominee has staying power for our group and Gathering of Friends 2018the clever, quick card game version may join it on my shelves if I can find it for a decent price. While Karuba plays in 30 minutes and feels like a real game, the card game can be knocked out in 15 minutes and it STILL feels pretty solid. You’re still trying to get your adventurers to their color-coded treasures with tiles that include paths through the jungle. Players ‘bid’ two tiles a turn, with the lowest total losing a tile each round. Then, you play the tiles to connect the explorers with their color-coded temple without running over each other but hopefully both using good paths that will help you pass gold and crystals along the way. It’s fast and will appeal to casual gamers just as the original did.

More to come later in the week…

PRESS RELEASE: Mobster Metropolis

PRESS RELEASE: Mobster Metropolis

Mobster Metropolis is a 2-4 player strategy board game, where players invest in turfs and recruits or conduct drive-by attacks in order to expand their syndicates and compete to become the most powerful gangster boss.

27 March 2018, Stockholm, Sweden. After four years of development and playtesting, Mobster Metropolis is live on Kickstarter. It is an intense game where elements of strategy and scheming are combined with both action-filled combat and resource management.

‘Carello, the godfather of the Metropolis has just died. Now gangsters gather and scheme to create their own legacies. Who will be intelligent and ruthless enough to become the leader of the most powerful gangster syndicate in Mobster Metropolis?’

During the game, players will expand their syndicates by investing in illegal businesses, recruit thugs and underlings, or send out drive-bys to attack other players and try to take their income. Short events will also let players draft cards, bid for resources and face the tenacious police.

The game presents a completely new combination of elements and mechanics. For example, the unique drive-by selectors let all players simultaneously decide where to target their drive-bys, before everyone reveals their decisions simultaneously. To add to the excitement, most defense is placed face-down on the board and not revealed until later that round, resulting in great mind games involving all players, regardless of playstyle and strategy.

The Youtube profiles at Tantrum House have made a video with a quick summary of the game and its rules.Mobster MetropolisDraft cunningly and visit the black market to arm your mobsters. Drive-by combats are decided by comparing the total attack or defense power players have on the board, combined with the bonus on the one card each player is allowed to play.

Mobster Metropolis

Mobster Metropolis features more than 700 components. It is a punchboard heavy game (without dice), including a huge number of tiles, tokens and cards for a total weight of over 7 pounds (3.5 kilos). Every component comes with graphics by artist Karl Nord. Although this is his first board game project, his creative work has won several international awards.

For more information on Mobster Metropolis:

STORMAKTEN Production is based in Stockholm, Sweden. The company was founded by four friends with a love for board games, who decided to take their friendship to a new dimension. After years of playing games together, they decided it was time contribute to the scene and create a game of their own. Read about STORMAKTEN Production at www.stormakten.se or follow the development of Mobster Metropolis at Instagram orFacebook or Twitter.

PRESS RELEASE: Monumental: The Board Game launched by Funforge and designer Matthew Dunstan

PRESS RELEASE: Monumental: The Board Game launched by Funforge and designer Matthew Dunstan

Funforge has launched a new Kickstarter for MONUMENTAL: The Board Game, an epic game of civilization, conquest and expansion by Matthew Dunstan. Per the Monumental FB page, here is a brief description of the game:

“In Monumental: The Board Game, each player leads a unique civilization. How will you shape your destiny, and how will history remember you? Dare you succeed as a warmonger, as a pioneer of cultural and scientific progress, or an architect of a great city and remarkable Wonders? Only the player with the most impressive civilization at the end of the game will win!

The aim of the game is to develop your civilization, by constructing new buildings and wonders in your City, achieving new scientific knowledge and cultural development, and using your military power to conquer new provinces.”

  • TRIC TRAC: “Designed specifically for Kickstarter, so that players have a great deal of fun playing it”.
  • CANARD PC“Nothing to say, civilization board game lovers feel at home”.
  • SYFANTASY“EXplore, eXpand, eXploit and eXterminate. Such an atmosphere reminds us of the best civilization games. As far as gameplay is concerned, there is a strong deckbuilding aspect with multiple strategic combos. And, best of all, Funforge decided to add minis to these mechanics, giving an extra dimension to the game.”
  • GEEK MAGAZINE“A deck-building and conquest civilization game that is innovative, dynamic and fun, playable in less than 2 hours – we recommend it!”

Stay up to date about Monumental: The Board Game with Funforge social channels:

  • Monumental FB page: @MONUMENTALboardgame
  • Funforge FB page: @Funforge
  • Twitter: @funforge
  • Instagram: @funforge

No word on review copies but many gameplay videos are online showing off the game being played. The miniatures alone are worth a look. Hoping to play it at the Gathering of Friends in a few weeks’ time but the campaign will be over by the time I reach Niagara Falls…