PRESS RELEASE: Stronghold Games and Spielworxx Announce Jointly the Publication of Sola Fide: The Reformation by Jason Matthews & Christian Leonhard

PRESS RELEASE: Stronghold Games and Spielworxx Announce Jointly the Publication of  Sola Fide: The Reformation by Jason Matthews & Christian Leonhard

The release of Sola Fide: The Reformation timed for the 500th Anniversary of The Reformation

New Jersey, USA and Billerbeck, Germany – August 8, 2016 –  Stronghold Games and Spielworxx are proud to announce jointly the publication of Sola Fide: The Reformation, a game designed by the renowned game design team of Jason Matthews and Christian Leonhard.

In Sola Fide: The Reformation, one player takes on the role of the Protestant movement, while the other plays the Catholic establishment. Players attempt to install Reformation in the Holy Roman Empire or try to prevent it, battling the Holy Roman Empire’s Imperial Circles. The game does not have a game board per say, but rather has 10 board tiles, each representing one of the Imperial Circles. Via card play, the two players try to win these ten Imperial Circles, each of which are worth 5 or 7 points. The game is for 2-players, ages 12+, and plays in 45 minutes.

Sola FideSola Fide: The Reformation faithfully tracks the Reformation, which Martin Luther started in 1517 with his “Ninety-Five Theses”. Luther criticized the selling of indulgences and that the Catholic doctrine of the merits of the saints had no foundation in the gospel. The “Protestants” soon incorporated doctrinal changes such as Sola Scriptura (“by scripture alone”) and Sola Fide (“by faith alone”).

The changes were not only theological, but also other factors played a role in The Reformation: the rise of nationalism, the Western Schism that eroded people’s faith in the Papacy, the perceived corruption of the Roman Curia, the impact of humanism, and the new learning of the Renaissance that questioned much of traditional thought. The Roman Catholic Church responded with a Counter-Reformation initiated by the Council of Trent.

The release of Sola Fide: The Reformation is timed with the 500th Anniversary in 2017 of The Reformation. Stronghold Games and Spielworxx commissioned the great game design team of Jason Matthews and Christian Leonhard to work specifically on this project. Matthews and Leonhard are foremost game design experts on historical games, previously designing 1960: The Making of the President, Founding Fathers, and Campaign Manager 2008. Jason Matthews also co-designed the critically acclaimed 1989: Dawn of Freedom, as well as Twilight Struggle, which is the #2 ranked game on Board Game Geek.

The release of Sola Fide: The Reformation continues the strategic partnership between Stronghold Games and Spielworxx, which was announced in December 2014, whereby Stronghold Games and Spielworxx would partner on select game releases.

Sola Fide

Sola Fide: The Reformation is scheduled for release to the general public in late October/November 2016. The MSRP for this game has not been set at this time. The game will make its debut at the Essen Spiel in Germany in October 2016.

Stronghold Games will release Sola Fide: The Reformation as the sixth game in its “The Great Designers Series”, which highlights games from the best game designers in the world.

About Stronghold Games

Stronghold Games LLC is a publisher of high-quality board and card games in the hobby game industry. Since 2009, Stronghold Games has released many highly-regarded games, including the best-selling “Survive: Escape From Atlantis!”, the most innovative deck-building game, “Core Worlds”, the smash-hit game line of “Space Cadets”, and many others. Stronghold Games publishes game designs developed both in-house and in partnership with publishers around the world. Stronghold Games is a Limited Liability Company formed in the State of Delaware USA.

About Spielworxx

Spielworxx was founded in 2010 in Germany and publishes cutting-edge board and card games for the gaming gourmet.

Contacts:

Stephen M. Buonocore, President

Stephen@StrongholdGames.com

Stronghold Games LLC

17 Sunflower Road

Somerset, NJ 08873 USA

Website: http://www.StrongholdGames.com

Phone: +1-908-304-5711

 

Uli Blennemann, President

uli@spielworxx.de

Spielworxx

Nielande 12

48727 Billerbeck

Germany

Website: http://www.spielworxx.de

Phone: +49-2543-9309107

Session Review: Imhotep from Phil Walker-Harding & KOSMOS

Session Review: Imhotep from Phil Walker-Harding & KOSMOS

Imhotep is a welcome addition to our gateway games collection, but I almost missed out on it. My first play was fine, but I was underwhelmed. This SDJ nominee was my final game of the day at an event last month. I had wanted to try out this title that was going to challenge Codenames for the Spiel Des Jahres and only spotted it late in the day. I had faith in the possibility that it could take on Vlaada Chvatil’s effortlessly wonderful party game because I’m a fan of Phil Walker-Harding‘s other games like Sushi Go!, Archaeology, Pack of Heroes, and Cacao. The game was loaned to me from another party who waited until I played before mentioning that he felt similarly (good, not great), suggesting that maybe the nomination was an Academy Award-style ‘make up for a previous snub’ to console the open wound of the excellent Cacao missing the cut. I nodded in agreement before taking off that night.

I was wrong. Imhotep deserved the nomination and the adoration of the SDJ jury. This is a very good game that I’ve now played nine times. Despite my first impression, I bought the game to play during our summertime game-cation (where we always sample the SDJ and KDJ nominees ahead of the announcements). I was impressed with the delight the newcomers experienced playing it and I how much enjoyed exploring the nuances of the game.

Imhotep Basics

Gameplay is straightforward and seems familiar, as with many great games. Players are trying to score points and win by placing stones on boats and delivering them to ports that let them score in various ways. This is done six times, with some scoring happening immediately, some happening at the end of the round, and the bulk of points coming at the end. The game has an old-school euro feel and I sense the strong influence of Michael Schacht, the master of minimalist designs that have incredible depth.

To play, you give your two to four players a pile of colored blocks and a sled tile that holds up to five stones at a time, select round cards based on the number of players you have, and then set up the modular port boards you opt to use. The port boards have two sides, with side A featuring ‘beginner’ options with simpler rules. There are also boats with one to four slots, four of which (in some combination of slots) you’ll bring up based on the round card. Each turn, players decide between three options: add up to three blocks from the player’s general supply to their sled, add a block to a boat from the sled, or sail a boat with enough blocks to a port for activation.

Imhotep

Four boats are available each round and they only can be sailed when one fewer than the number they will handle have been placed on them (pointless clarification: yes, the one-block boat needs a block). At that point, any player (whether or not they have a block on the boat) can sail it into a port. This is important because players can send a boat into a port that doesn’t help the players with blocks on it very much. Managing this narrow range of choices still makes for interesting decisions, even if it doesn’t sound that intriguing just reading the gameplay mechanisms.

There are five ports and only four boats, so one is skipped each round of play. Furthermore, fewer blocks can reach those ports if players send them early so there’s definitely some dynamics around whether players opt to play offensively or defensively. The ports resolve as the boats were loaded, with blocks at the front resolving first. In some cases, this gives that player first choice; on other ports, it just means their block goes into place first – sometimes to their frustration.

The ports are the way players score, but they work differently.

  • The Market lets players choose from a set of mostly face-up cards (the B side has facedown cards), which gives them various immediate or future chances to act or score. The blue cards are an effective way to do double actions, the red ones let you place a block into one of the other ports immediately, the purple are award set collecting points, and the green ones are end of game bonuses for the performance of other ports.
  • The Temple scores at the end of each round, with spaces for five blocks. The interesting bit here is that this option delivers points for the blocks viewable from above. Thus, blocks placed early can score over and over – and new blocks ruin this plan.
  • The Pyramid scores points immediately, but the loading order is a factor because different spaces provide different point rewards.
  • The Burial Chamber and the Obelisk ports both score competitively at the end. The former is pattern-based and loading order is a big deal, while the latter is a raw comparison on side A and a timing/commitment game on side B.

While the side A cards are ‘for beginners’, there is no reason for gamers to not begin with the side B variants. They are a trifle more complicated, but they also make the game better. Players sail the four boats six times before a winner is declared. With experienced players, it’s a satisfying thirty minutes.

Imhotep’s Modular Rules

Much has been made of Friedemann Friese’s 504, a game that takes rules variations to the extreme. Imhotep has some possibilities here but it’s done in a simpler way. Dominion popularized the inspiration from older games like Cosmic Encounter for modern euro games. Indeed, you can see a Dominion inspiration in the way Imhotep’s designer expanded his hit game Sushi Go! for Sushi Go Party (see my adoring review of that game here).

Imhotep

With Imhotep, the game’s central mechanism allows for new ports to be plugged in that score block placement in different ways. The flipside variants on the backside reminded me of Antoine Bauza, who famously mentioned on my podcast that one of his publishers, Repos Productions, encourages this strongly – suggesting it’s otherwise a waste of the back of cardboard. I happen to agree; this feature allows for varied play via selection or random options. I can only assume Walker-Harding is cooking up additional ports for expected expansions of the game. Heck, we designed a couple on the spot last time we played.

The Final Word on Imhotep

Imhotep is a well-designed, interesting game that I’m glad is on our shelves. I do think gamers will enjoy it more if they play the B variants or some combination of A and B. Some longtime players may feel like they have enough gateway games but, like Hanging Gardens, Carcassonne, Kingdom Builder and even Schacht’s own Zooloretto, it fills a useful spot in a collection. Imhotep is also good enough to delight experienced gamers who enjoy a super-filler with a 90’s euro feel.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Imhotep

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (P)lay It Now TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Press Release: Dized is an effortless way to learn board games

Press Release: Dized is an effortless way to learn board games

As the world of board games is expanding and becoming more versatile, one element hasn’t changed with the times the rulebook. To tackle this issue the Finnish publisher Playmore Games is releasing Dized, a smart device application that will be the friend at the table teaching you how to play board games.

Dized is an interactive tutorial app for board games, and with it players can start playing the games immediately out of the box. The tutorial keeps track of what the players have learned and teaches only relevant information. It also answers any questions players might have about the game.

“I personally can’t think of a more important concept for the board gaming industry right now. We’ve been planning Dized_logo_icon-300pxDized for two years now and gotten into full speed with the development this year. We have a dedicated software studio building the application and we’ve recruited several new team members for the project,” explains CEO Jouni Jussila. Players had the chance to see the application for the first time at the UK Games Expo in Birmingham in the first week of June. This preview version is built to host one board game, with more games to follow later on.

Dized will be crowdfunded later this year with the aim to develop the tools further so that any developers and publishers can build their own interactive tutorials.

“Our goal is that in a few years the library of tutorials in Dized will be so vast, that no matter which game you pick from your shelf, you can just skip the manual and start playing immediately. Just like in video games, in the future you will not need to read a manual to start playing”, says product manager Anna Lapinsh.

Players can try out the tutorials on their own iOS and Android devices later this year as a demo version will be released before Gen Con in August.

Playmore Games invites everyone to come check out Dized at booth A9 at the UK Games Expo to see the next board game revolution begin.

Further information: CEO Jouni Jussila, +358 46 9200 885
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Session Review: Bring Your Own Book from Matthew Moore and Luke Nalker and Gamewright Games

Session Review: Bring Your Own Book from Matthew Moore and Luke Nalker and Gamewright Games

Bring Your Own Book (subtitled “The Game of Borrowed Phrases”) had me at the title. As a voracious reader, I knew it was going to be a game that I’d enjoy. I wasn’t preparedBring Your Own Book for the game to play so well with our entire group, including some I’d describe as ‘non-readers’. It’s 2016 – what can you do? Although bibliophiles will embrace the game quicker, you need not be obsessed with books to enjoy it. Originally released as a self-published game, Gamewright has snapped it up. Thank goodness they did because it’s fun and we laughed a lot while playing.

Bring Your Own Book is amusing for the reason most party games are: you get to inject the personality of the people playing into the experience. On the surface, it’s a pretty straightforward. Like Apples to Apples, Dixit, and Cards Against Humanity, players submit an answer based on criteria set by a game card. That player selects their favorite option and awards the card to the player who selected it. The subjective selection of ‘good’ answers based on whose turn it is drives the mirth in these games. Bring Your Own Book is no exception here.

Yes, You Literally Bring Your Own Book

The innovation here: Instead of a hand of cards with possible answers, players arm themselves with a book. The book’s text is the source for their answers. Once the game card is read, players scour their books to find a phrase or line to match the card. Categories are all over the place, which is amusing. Some examples of the witty card selections: “A line from an unpublished Dr. Seuss book” “A pickup line” or “The title of a romance novel.”

One might read that description and think the game is more interesting for readers who pick their favorite book to use. Not so. The real fun comes out of the truly bizarre answers people try to pass off as a reasonable answer. I did well in our first game with a book on Irish history (I’m a mutt but more Irish/English than anything else). One of our players had a picture book about gnomes, which was a great source for ridiculous responses. Considering the card picker can select the winner based on their own criteria (funniest or the most appropriate for the category), going the funny route can often work and it almost did for the gnome book-wielder.

Bring Your Own Book

If you’re one of those folks who have moved on from deadtree books to the ebook world, you can still enjoy the game. While we had people raiding a few of our bookshelves, there’s no reason why players can’t just bring up a book on their Kindle or iPhone to use. Furthermore, you can get many free books online from your local library or online resources to use in a snap.

(Yes, BGB listeners who know me to be a total tech-head might ask about these bookshelves in my home. I do mostly read e-books but the deadtree variety are so cheap these days that sometimes, I just buy them instead…hey, I got this Morrissey biography for $.08 plus shipping!)

Oh, yeah – the winner is the first one to four or five cards. I think that’s it. Seriously, if you care about who wins, you’re missing the point of party games.

The Final Word on Bring Your Own Book

If you like this style of party game, you’re bound to enjoy Bring Your Own Book. While I love and admire clever party games like Codenames, games where you submit answers that rely on player relationships are the biggest source of laughs. The delightful bonus for Bring Your Own Book is how it allows players to get even more creative in their selections. Yes, it’s lower-effort creativity than the likes of Balderdash (another of my favorites), but it works. The game is now on our Top 10 Party Games list.

Bring Your Own Book plays in 20-30 minutes and with 3-8 players. Of course, you can control these factors by simply handing out more cards or increasing the threshold for winning. The packaging is also delightfully bookish, another fine detail for us book-lovers. I’m jazzed by the packaging Gamewright has been using, although my favorite has been the dice games boxes with the magnets you’ll find housing Qwixx, Dodge Dice and Rolling America. Not anymore – look at the cool addition to Bring Your Own Book just below. You track the books used to play the game as you go. What a terrific idea and one that is unique to Bring Your Own Book.

Bring Your Own Book

Bring Your Own Book is available now from Gamewright and you can follow the author here.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Bring Your Own Book

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: Copy provided by the publisher for independent review.

Session Review: Sushi Go Party! by Phil Walker-Harding and Gamewright Games

Session Review: Sushi Go Party! by Phil Walker-Harding and Gamewright Games

Don’t you hate it when a new edition of your favorite game comes out and the old one might as well go in the trash bin? Sushi Go Party will not do that to you. Fans will love the expanded version and they can easily recycle their previous copy by handing it to a friend as a great introduction to modern board games. That is, until the friend loves it so much that they upgrade to Sushi Go Party and pass the basic game on, too. The new version is that welcome and good.

Sushi Go For Beginners (skip this section, experts)

If you don’t know the original Sushi Go, where have you been? This inexpensive crowd-pleaser has enjoyably light Sushi Go Partygame play (plays in 20-30 minutes) and charming artwork sure to dazzle young and new-to-modern-game players. The game works incredibly well for that set, while serious gamers often like it as a filler.

Play is simple but interesting: players get a hand of cards, selecting and revealing one at a time, and then passing the hand to the left (a ‘pick and pass’ mechanism, as it is sometimes called). This is done until all cards are gone, which triggers scoring for the round. Points are awarded for sets that are collected and scored in unique ways for different cards (e.g., majority, multipliers, pairs, etc.) The game plays over three rounds, with building scores and a final bonus for dessert cards collected over the course of the game. The original game is enormous fun and so worth the cost of this small tin chock full of fun. But the new edition is even better.

Sushi Go Party Expands The Menu

Yes, it’s still Sushi Go but bringing the party means two key changes: more players and more variety. The new expanded version offers both in spades. Sushi Go Party plays up to eight – a very welcome feature – and combines the original game with the Dominion concept. Designer Phil Walker-Harding (whose SDJ-nominated Imhotep is all the rage right now) gives buyers of the big new tin a host of new cards in sets that you can mix and match for varied play.

In an inspired thematic choice, Walker-Harding has added ‘menus’ of card sets to play. Card types are now categorized as Rolls, Appetizers, Specials, and Desserts. Your custom bento box of card selection options (you can use a pre-made ones or build your own) are clearly shown with cardboard markers that sit in the center of the new score track. Hurray to that addition as well. No more score-keeping elsewhere on paper or scoring apps round to round.

Card and menu selections from each type can adjust the feel of the game for more interaction or to appeal to larger player counts. For example, there’s now a Spoon card that allows players to request a card from other player hands. There are also risky propositions with Eel and Tofu cards, which require players to have specific numbers of cards or earn a penalty. Additional desserts have been added and a distribution tweak that has more of these end-of-the-game cards rolling in each round makes these post-meal bonuses work better.

Sushi Go Party

The Final Word on Sushi Go Party

Like Sushi Go, Sushi Go Party plays quickly and it doesn’t take any longer to play with eight than it does with the original five player limit. In fact, the new edition even has improved rules to play the game well with only two players. My wife and I tried the new two-player version and it worked quite well. While it isn’t a game that I’d expect to transition so well (even the wondrous 7 Wonders is MUCH better as 7 Wonders: Duel than in in the two-player variant of the original), Walker-Harding has come up with a good way to handle things when you want Sushi For Two.

Sushi Go Party is an ideal upgrade to the original and an instant buy for fans of the game. Everyone who plays it with us says they want to buy it. The game is now on our must-include board game list for travel and big game parties. The US edition is out from Gamewright and you can see previews of many of the new cards on the designer’s Twitter feed.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Sushi Go Party

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: Copy provided by the publisher for independent review.

Session Review: Team Play from Johannes Schmidauer-König and Schmidt Spiele

Session Review: Team Play from Johannes Schmidauer-König and Schmidt Spiele

Team Play had significant buzz coming out of The Gathering of Friends 2016, seeming like it was this year’s Strike. Like Strike, which had been overlooked for a few years, GOF attendees seemed to have racked up multiple plays over the course of the event. While that’s not hard to do with shorter games, players obviously kept playing because they were having fun and I ordered a copy immediately. I was not disappointed.

While this quick-play Schmidt Spiele game from Johannes Schmidauer-König has a rummy feel with the draft-and-collect mechanism at its center, the game that came to mind on our first play it Take It or Leave It.  In both games, players draw variable goal cards and compile the means of fulfill them. While the latter does the job with dice, Team Play has players collect sets of cards and adds partnership to the mix.

Team Play Board Games

How Does Team Play…play?

Setup provides players with a single goal card and a variable number of hand cards, with the start player receiving one and the number increasing around the table. Then, players draw two cards each turn (draft-style from a three face-up cards and the deck) to collect cards that meet the requirements of private or one public goal card. Goal cards range in value from 1 to 6 points with more points awarded for harder sets of the same rank, runs, flushes – sometimes a combo of those elements. I admire the iconography on the cards, which I find easy to explain. Completing goals gives your team points, which is how you win.

The regular hand cards come in two colors (red and blue) and range in rank from 1 to 8, with three of each variation appearing in the deck. Each turn, you draw two, complete any goals you can from the cards in-hand (which are discarded). Then, you can pass one or two cards to your partner. While you are not allowed to discuss card passes, card-playing partners know how to do that with cards – both in actual passes and observation of your partner’s actions.  This is one of the elements that makes Team Play work so well. I’m pretty aggressive in my passing. If I don’t need it for the goal I’m working right now, off it goes to my partner. Who knows when it will be helpful?

The game ends when one team collects eight completed goal cards. While players only keep one goal card at a time, they have the option to discard the first one drawn. This is a key point since it helps players optimize their plans. I also like that you can rush the game by completing easier goals to put pressure on the other team. While this isn’t always possible, I like the strategy because it throws the over-thinkers off their guard. Those people need to move along so I always like when a game includes that option (particularly for fillers that are SUPPOSED TO BE fast).

Final Analysis of Team Play

We’re big fans of Team Play around here and it’s already hit the nickel list. While it has appealed to my family with the quick play time, partnership opportunity, and the simple but planning-friendly rules, we’ve also had enormous success showing it to other people. I see this becoming one of our opening fillers for a day of games or a lovely twenty-minute closer. While the game kind of made me yearn to get my own copy of Take It or Leave It (I played the Strategicon library copy), Team Play‘s compact box means it will probably remain the choice of these two when packing up for game day.

Boardgame Babylon Rating

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Session Review: Darkest Night, 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games

Session Review: Darkest Night, 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games

As a fan of cooperative games, I’ve been interested to try Victory Point GamesDarkest Night for a while. The sub-genre is one of my favorites and I find it hard to believe it’s almost a decade on since Pandemic made its splash onto the board game scene and inspired the hobby to get on the cooperative game train. Sure, it had predecessors but Matt Leacock’s tightly-designed end-of-the-world wonder introduced a larger audience to the sub-genre and we’ve had a lot of great ones and many not-so-great ones since then.

DN‘s publisher is run by Alan Emrich. Alan is a genuine hero for Southern California gamers, as one of the guys responsible for the Strategicon series of conventions while making many other contributions to the hobby even before he launched VPG. I was glad to hear they were doing a new edition of the game with updated rules, gorgeous new miniatures and stretch goals-a-go-go. Having recently gotten interested in the design work of local designer Jeremy Lennert anyway (his Hunt: The Unknown Quarry was recently brought into digital form thanks also to a Kickstarter campaign), I thought it was finally the chance to give it a go. Jeremy was kind enough to explain the game for me and ‘referee’ a play of the title at a recent game event, which I partially Periscoped while we got the rules explanation if you’re inclined to give it a look.

Darkest Night is a fantasy-themed cooperative game but it’s no Pandemic clone (that’s Defenders of the Realm). Instead, Darkest Night draws more from the feel of adventure-oriented co-ops that give players more of a chance to develop their character (think Runebound or Return of the Heroes). This is welcome because one of the problems with co-ops is the tendency for one player to kind of take over everyone’s roles (“The Director,” they are often politely called). Darkest Night gives players an opportunity to develop themselves out with powers from their own deck of 10 cards (13, if stretch goals happen). I’m also in love with the statistic the characters have. No typical “Strength” and “Dexterity” stuff here. Instead, you have “Grace” (hit points) and “Secrecy” (how hard you are to find). The way Secrecy works is intriguing since this value will govern how easy it is for the Necromancer to find you. Kind of like Fearsome Floors, he’ll move to the closest player he detects when he moves.

The new edition has gorgeous miniatures that you can buy as an add-on plus some expanded rules. While this was my first play of the game and I cannot compare the new rules to the old, it would appear the updates expand the options available and make the game even more flexible. As with many games, it’s the cards that bring the variation to life. The new edition adds even more event cards, which are drawn from most locations. These cards can lead to conflicts, bad mojo stuff happening that will provide you misery and, occasionally, something not terrible. While the different cards are welcome, they do feel very 80’s Games Workshop, as they usually have a die roll to see what happens. I’m of two minds on that one. While the additional variation of cards not always doing the same thing can be enjoyable, there are times when you get results like “nothing happens.” Kind of a yawn but okay if it happens rarely. In our game, it happened more than that.

The Event cards also trigger some interesting elements to add to the board, including Quests. These are opportunities for characters to complete a task to gain an advantage but they also come with timers. The urgency and interest these provide make for a richer game and it’s a welcome mechanism. There are also Artifacts and Mystery cards that provide some other opportunities for interaction with game mechanisms that help players along. We played on a prototype board so it is hard to judge it but there are a lot of things that can show up on the board and it can get a bit crowded, but all of these elements work well for the game.

Then the bad guy gets a turn (notably, after all players get a go – not like Pandemic where it happens after each player). Blights (or the ‘infection cubes’, if you like) that get dropped out onto the board are implemented in an interesting way as they turn regions of the board into startlingly difficult places to be. Instead of just stacking up to show their threat as in Pandemic, Blights provide a specific penalty to the players at the location where they sprout. They’ll hit you for a combat or evading penalty or some other problem. Blights works well – in fact, my only issue with the Blights is the design of the tiles. While you are usually defending against or evading them, those values are quite small. Near the bottom, in a MUCH bigger font is the value you need to roll to defeat them (and the penalty for failure), but this is less often used. Were I their graphic designer, I’d switch those immediately to increase the ease of use because we kept having to squint to complete the action we did the most with these guys.

(continued here)

Session Review: Darkest Night 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games (continued)

Session Review: Darkest Night 2nd Edition from Victory Point Games (continued)

(continued from the first page)

While Blight works well, I do wish I could see the effort help us manage the threats. While removing them reduces frustration, I had a hard time tracking how our efforts were helping in the battle against the Necromancer. Once in a while, something we did reduce the ‘Darkness’ (a marker not unlike the Knizia Lord of the Rings tracker, or the Minion Hunter –  the precursor to all of these games – track that all four threats live on), which felt like we were striking a blow. Too often, though, our efforts felt like they were just us swatting flies away from our efforts to get enough artifacts to get enough clues to do…something. While the turns were short, a lot of times, it just felt like we weren’t doing very much and yet turns have a lot going on from an administrative perspective. You start with that event card, which can often turn into multiple event cards. Then you do your action: moving (again, a whole turn to travel makes sense in the name of the mechanisms but not in the name of players feeling a sense of accomplishment), taking a single swipe at a Blight (miss the roll and the turn is over, bub, which could mean another event or just lost Grace), or do something with one of the cards on the space. You can also just rest to restore Grace. Then, you need to deal with any monster Blights (either fight them off – notably, not killing them – or just evade them).

Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 12.42.40 PMThere are just an awful lot of turns. The length of a turn is a challenging problem. As a eurogamer, I’m no fan of lost turns. While the Web (a Blight that makes a player lose a turn when they leave a space with it) is manageable because you can opt to fight and remove Blights, it is less appealing to go to the Monastery and pray, only to find that you get absolutely nothing for it with bad rolls. I won’t make a religious joke here but I will say that I’d rather see the devotion do you good regardless of the dice. Darkest Night has that war-game sense of resolutional luck rather than situational luck. I’m sure that’s a lot of the appeal for RPG players and the huge community of fans the game enjoys (which has led to many expansions).

Unfortunately, the storytelling is not as strong as the interesting mechanisms. The names are all generic and the board is made up of a handful of locations that have functional names “Monastery” and “Swamp,” that are descriptive but not evocative. While the Necromancer is a threat somehow, it’s not something that comes out in the game much. In Pandemic, you’re saving the world (real places with city names) from the disease and the paths to a loss make it clear what is happening. This is even more powerful and effective in the truly awesome Pandemic Legacy. In Knizia’s Lord of the Rings, Knizia benefits from the legendarily intriguing Middle Earth, which is abstracted out but there is a definite sense of location with the unique characteristics of the areas.

It’s an interesting problem. Is it more appealing to let players imagine their own names with the characters to tell their own story? Sure, I buy that idea. The 29 characters and their unique 13 card decks provide players with a chance to experience the game many different ways, adding to the replay value of the game. Yet, I can’t say the same for those generic name for the locations on the board. There’s nothing particularly inspiring about going to The Forest or The Castle. That’s where the storytelling would be welcome. Even the Necromancer seems to want a name to make him seem more grounded and real. As a double-size cardboard standee, he looks imposing but without a backstory or more visible signs of the impending doom, Darkest Night’s story didn’t hold my attention for the full length of the game, even though the mechanisms are strong.

Darkest Night plays in two to three hours but it was a first game for our crew so it ran longer. I think my recent forays into three-hour games of Star Wars: Rebellion may have given me a false sense of my stamina for over two-hour games. I believe the storytelling strength of Star Wars: Rebellion is why three hours with that game feels like not enough time. Of course, familiarity with almost, ahem, forty years of Star Wars in my life means there is a built-in level of interest there. Still, I think the rich theming is what makes it all the more compelling and keeps players deeply engaged.

Darkest Night 2nd Edition is good fun for RPG cooperative board gamers and is available now on Kickstarter. It’s already funded but a bunch of excellent stretch goals await. I recommend you check it out because if you like this kind of game, you get a whole lot of fun in this new edition. The campaign runs through June 11 and the details can be found here.

Boardgame Babylon Rating

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Press Release: Puzzle Adventures: Millions of fans look forward to the app version of Ravensburger‘s online puzzle hit

Press Release: Puzzle Adventures: Millions of fans look forward to the app version of Ravensburger‘s online puzzle hit

Munich/Ravensburg, April 28th, 2016: Ravensburger’s most successful social game is now available as an app. Fans of Puzzle Adventures can now also enjoy their favorite game on their smartphone or tablet.

Just a few weeks after its launch on Facebook in 2011, the game from Ravensburger was already a huge hit, with hundreds of thousands of players racing against the clock to put the small puzzle pieces together. And the fan base has grown steadily: to date, more than eight million people have played this addictive game.

“Puzzle Adventures is a unique success story for us”, Thomas Bleyer, director of Ravensburger Digital, declared. “With no other title have we reached so many players around the world. That is what is so fascinating about puzzles: Anyone can immediately start playing without any explanation; there are virtually no language barriers. That is surely one of the reasons why our game is so successful internationally. Our players come from more than 200 countries around the globe.”

Many fans were asking for a mobile version of the game. That is why Puzzle Adventures is now available as a free app for iOS and Android devices.

Puzzle Adventures is the result of combining fast-paced, exciting and competitive gameplay with more than 100 years of puzzle expertise at Ravensburger, Europe’s largest producer of jigsaw puzzles. The digital adaptation offers hectic action: Who can finish first and who can put the most difficult puzzles together?

Now, anytime and anywhere, you can play individual puzzles that only take a few minutes to solve. Playing against the clock ensures it is thrilling, while different levels of difficulty and a clever reward system motivate the player to keep puzzling.

You also meet ‘Jiggy’ and ‘Valentina’: these cute puzzle pieces with big round eyes provide useful tips and guide you through the different puzzle worlds with over 40 wonderful themes: colourful country life, fantasy worlds, animal kingdom, a world of dreams… There are over 700 different designs and more themes are being added all the time, making Puzzle Adventures a truly fascinating adventure for all puzzle fans.

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id1005048909

Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ravensburgerdigital.puzzleadventures

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01DBVHEFS

More information from the publisher: www.ravensburger-digital.com | www.ravensburger-games.com

Unboxing Babylon: Boardgame Babylon opens up

Unboxing videos for board games have been popular for years. I’ve never watched one. For some reason, I figured maybe I’d start to understand their appeal by recording one. My kids think I’m nuts and they’re probably right. But who cares? Conveniently, I had two boxes handy to open up. I received the Geek and Sundry Nerdblock (only about two weeks after they said it was shipped) and recently grabbed up Star Wars: Rebellion. So, here’s a quick (hmm…maybe not quick but more like twenty minutes) video of me talking through the opening up process.

Do I understand why unboxing videos are appealing now? Maybe. If you’re keen to see all those new components (SW: Rebellion is wonderful here), this is cool. I guess if you were on the fence about Lootcrate or another subscription service, it might help show me what’s what in the latest versions that might have skipped out on ordering. To be honest, I’ve avoided those subscription services because I feared mostly remaindered, clearance geek crap no one wants.

Is that what happened with my unboxing experience? Well, check the video below (streamed on Periscope to a very small audience) to see how the Nerdblock turned out.

Star Wars: Rebellion is the second half but I mostly just open things up to see what it all looks like. I’m excited to play the game with my son tomorrow and give this monster but very interesting game a shot. The double-board setup is so massive that I expect we’ll need to set up a second table to fit it. That sheer scale has my son excited – he’s already a bigger Star Wars fan than I am so this is right up his alley. I’ve had more luck getting him to the table with Imperial Assault and X-Wing than almost any other game (yeah, he loves Smash-Up, too).

Anyway, so maybe I kind of get unboxing. It’s not what I call ‘full-attention entertainment’ (FAE). In other words, I’m expecting you listen/watch it while doing at least one other thing. I had fun recording it and hope other people will do so, too. We’ll see if it happens again.