5 Quick Questions About Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 from Matt Leacock

5 Quick Questions About Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 from Matt Leacock

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR.

Let’s see how Matt Leacock, one of the designers of the red-hot Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 does, shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for the Pandemic Legacy: Season 2?

Matt Leacock: Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 continues the story of Pandemic Legacy: Season 1. Set 71 years in the future, it lets you embark on an epic adventure to bring humanity back from the brink of extinction. It features new mechanisms and surprises, but the rhythms of the game will be familiar to those who enjoyed the first season.

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Matt Leacock: When as Z-man put “Season 1” on the first game, Rob and I looked at each other and realized that there might be more of them. And after the Season 1 shot up the charts, it was clear that players wanted more, too.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Matt Leacock: This game continues the everything you loved about the first season, in fresh new ways. It’s a great way to bond with a few other players as you navigate your away through a high stakes story.

Pandemic Legacy: Season 2

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Matt Leacock: This game gives you more freedom to choose your own path than Season 1 – it’s less on rails. For example, right from the first game in January, you’ll need to decide which direction you’d like to explore in the world. You can be your own worst enemy however, if you don’t consider the bigger picture when deciding what your group should do. The game forgives losses along the way, but there is a wider “cone of possibilities” that you’ll need to navigate. That can mean that better players may have an easier time while others may struggle a bit more than they did in the first season.

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Pandemic Legacy, Season 2. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interview?

Matt Leacock: 60 minutes per game for an average of 16–18 games per campaign. (12–24 games are possible.)
2-4 players. New players can join or drop over the course of the campaign. (Solo play is also possible if one player plays multiple characters.)
More from Z-man: https://www.zmangames.com/en/products/pandemic-legacy-season-2/
BGG: https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/221107/pandemic-legacy-season-2

BGB JOKE TIME

“What time does Sean Connery get to Wimbledon?”

“Tennish”

That’s all I’ve got for today.

5 Quick Questions about Civil Unrest from Upstart Games

5 Quick Questions about Civil Unrest from Upstart Games

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR. Let’s see how Upstart Games, publisher of Civil Unrest (coming to Kickstarter soon) does, shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Civil Unrest:

Upstart: Civil Un-rest is a strategic board game with miniatures. (The game) takes place in an alternate modern-day fantasy world where magic and technology have been combined. Players take control of law enforcement or political activists who are trying to take control of Three Circle City, a place where all fantasy races are welcomed but have not been able to get along peacefully.

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Upstart: I began creating this game in my college days. The funny thing is, during the game’s conception back in the early 1990’s, I believed that political movements becoming waring factions willing to commit acts of violence was a thing of parody. Now, unfortunately, it has become a reality. It is my sincere hope (that) by creating this satirical alternate reality, people can gain some perspective on political violence.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Upstart: I believe the miniatures are unique, but also can be great proxies for other games. The game is a fast-paced miniatures game, which is rare. Also, it’s satirical theme (that) can be a conversation starter.

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Upstart: Well, there are no good guys in this game. Though Civil Unrest is political in nature, the game itself does not paint any one side as good or bad. So, if you are sensitive about politics you may want to skip this one.

Thanks for telling us a bit about Civil Unrest. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Upstart: 2 Players, play time is between 30 to 60 minutes. Right now, all I have is a Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/upstartgames/

JOKE TIME

Upstart: My day time gig is IT so here goes:

A Network Tech walks into the doctor’s offices and says, “Doc it hurts when IP…”

DISCLOSURE: Boardgame Babylon is not liable for damage to your sensibilities from the jokes these game designers submit.

Check out the promo video:

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5 Quick Questions About the Battle for Greyport

5 Quick Questions About the Battle for Greyport

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR. Let’s see how Jeff Morrow, publisher of The Battle for Greyport (a relatively new title from Slugfest Games) does, shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for the Battle for Greyport?

Jeff Morrow: Battle for Greyport is a cooperative deckbuilding game based on the characters and world of our popular Red Dragon Inn franchise. You and your adventuring companions are about to head to the tavern for a pint when you are rudely interrupted by monsters attacking the city! There’s no time to properly outfit the adventuring party – you need to gather an ad-hoc assortment of heroes and items as you go. Each round, everyone helps fight the current defending player’s monsters, so there’s lots of interactivity and almost no down time. The game continues until the players defeat the monsters and their boss, or until any player is defeated.

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?The Battle for Greyport

Jeff Morrow: My old friend Paul Peterson (of Smash-Up fame) told me that a friend of his, Nate Heiss, had a game that might be right up our alley. So Nate pitched us with a fantasy-themed deckbuilder called Guilds of the Realm. It had a lot of good ideas, but had generic “characters” in the form of the guilds – like the rogues’ guild, for example. So we took those characters and gave them new names – specifically, we turned them into our existing characters from The Red Dragon Inn!
BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?
Jeff Morrow: If you like challenging deckbuilders and coop games, then this game is for you. We agree that there are too many games out there, but interestingly, there are very few in the coop deckbuilder niche.
BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?
Jeff Morrow: We’re sadistic and mean, so we would never want you to know that since we released the game we’ve updated the rules and errata-ed the introductory scenario.
BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about The Battle for Greyport. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?
2-5 players, takes about 20-30 minutes per player. You can find more information here.
JOKE TIME
Jeff Morrow: Two chemists walk into a bar. The first says, “I’ll have H2O.” The second says, “I’ll have H2O too.” The second one dies.

And – want to learn more? Watch:

DISCLOSURE: Boardgame Babylon is not liable for damage to your sensibilities from the jokes these game designers submit.

5 Quick Questions About Mercenaries from Pearson Games

5 Quick Questions About Mercenaries from Pearson Games

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR.

Let’s see how the Ryan Pearson of Pearson Games, designer of Mercenaries does, shall we?


BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Mercenaries?

Ryan Pearson: Mercenaries is a deck-building RPG with tactical movement, skirmish and dungeon crawling elements. Each player is a Mercenary, seeking to delve into a dungeon or location to clear out Monsters. As these are not grand heroes of valor- they only care about themselves. Only the player who lands the killing blow gets the EXP and victory points. Players use the EXP to buy new cards for their deck- which they’ll need to as monsters they kill also end up in their deck, gumming it up with cards that don’t do anything (until the end of the game for victory points). That combined with the games 6 x 6 grid and movement means you can manipulate other players by making it harder for them to reach a monster- or let something nasty charge towards them!

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Ryan Pearson: Me (Ryan) and Colin (my Uncle) have had a long love of boardgames and RPGs including D&D, Descent, Summoner Wars, Dominion, Battlelore, Thunderstone, and (for more mature gamers) Hero Quest. We’d always make house rules to games to fix balancing issues, give them more bite or to get them just how we liked them. In a sort of epiphany moment, I exclaimed to Colin one day, “That’s exactly the mindset people who makes games have. Why don’t we?” So we did. We took inspiration from what we love about the games we like and used it as a basis for Mercenaries.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Ryan Pearson: We noticed that no game combined deck-building (a deck that cycles through constantly that you can add to) with tactical movement. It was always a pre-fixed deck or no battlefield. Further, deck-building games often rely on currency you have in your hand at that time. Making the focus of the game balancing your offense to kill monsters (or just beat their number a’la Top Trumps) and currency to buy new stuff. It lacks the bite of an RPG or a TCG – which is then often buffed up with random elements like dice rolls – and can be finished in half an hour. With Mercenaries, Monsters don’t just vanish as soon as they see a bigger number – you’ve got to whittle them down. You can buy cards for your deck as long as you meet the conditions (have enough EXP and specific requirements for each type of card – i.e., Healing Potions can only be purchased after you kill something).

The game is for longer gaming sessions with plenty of strategy, that doesn’t require a splatbook or endless notes. And the only luck is from what you draw (which you can manipulate with what you put in your deck and cards you play) and who ranged monsters target. If you thought Dominion, Thunderstone, or Descent needed to have a bit more going on, Mercenaries will satisfy that craving.

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Ryan Pearson: We’re planning to support it with free content. Sure we will have expansions packs which can be purchased, but we’re going to upload our own combinations of Monsters, Abilities, Skills, and Room cards for more adventures. And if fans email in their own combinations for adventures, we are happy to host them! So, while the base set of Mercenaries has 4 adventures, that number can grow once you cultivate more.

So there’s that, and that we are more like brothers than uncle & nephew. That includes the teasing.

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Mercenaries. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Ryan Pearson: The game supports 2 to 4 players (5 if you include a DM to control the monsters) and can be played competitively or cooperatively. The game has 4 adventures which take approximately 3 hours to complete.

You can find out more about us at our website, which has links to the game and store.  You can also email us with questions.

Joke Time
Colin likes the classic jokes. A horse walks into a bar. The barman asks “Why the long face?”

DISCLOSURE: Boardgame Babylon is not liable for damage to your sensibilities from the jokes these game designers submit.

5 Quick Questions About Battlestations Second Edition by Jeff Siadek and Gorilla Games

5 Quick Questions About Battlestations Second Edition by Jeff Siadek and Gorilla Games

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR.

Let’s see how Jeff Siadek, designer of Battlestations, 2nd Edition (from his own Gorilla Games – and available NOW) does, shall we?


BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Hotshots?

Jeff SiadekBattlestations is the game where you get to crew a starship. It is a board game-RPG hybrid with action simultaneously on the modular ships and the ships on the hex map. 

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Jeff Siadek: (1979’s) Star Fleet Battles has starship combat that is tactically rich. Space Hulk lets you move around inside a ship. Star Wars has heroic characters on amazing journeys. Star Trek has a crew of adventurers working together to solve problems ranging from mysteries to a good old fashioned space battle.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Jeff Siadek: This game is a crunchy space action RPG with tactical depth. There is nothing like it.

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Jeff Siadek: I’ve been working on a deal with (Star Fleet Battles’ Publisher) ADB to do Battlestations Star Fleet for over a decade and haven’t given up hope.

Battlestations
There’s a cool hardback book of the rules, too.

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Battlestations. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Jeff Siadek: Battlestations, 2nd Edition is

  • 1-? Players (optimized for 4 to 6)
  • Each mission takes 1-2 hours
  • 45 plastic miniatures
  • 8 lbs of full color cardboard
  • Quickstart rules
  • Advanced 300 page hardcover rule book sold separately
JOKE TIME:
What’s the difference between a board gamer and a role player?
The role player stands up and gesticulates when he rants against card players.

DISCLOSURE: Boardgame Babylon is not liable for damage to your sensibilities from the jokes these game designers submit.

More quick reads? Check out our other 5 Quick Questions posts.

Want to learn EVEN MORE about Battlestations? I had Jeff and his producer, Joey Vigour, to my house to play one time. It was a lot of fun and I wrote about it here. And there was also a podcast, that thing I used to do more often. And, yeah, buy the thing!

5 Quick Questions About Hotshots from Fireside Games & Designer Justin De Witt

5 Quick Questions About Hotshots from Fireside Games & Designer Justin De Witt

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR.

Let’s see how Justin De Witt, designer of Hotshots (a game from Fireside Games that is AVAILABLE NOW) does, shall we?


BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Hotshots?

Justin De Witt: Hotshots is a press-your-luck wildfire fighting game where 1 to 4 players work together to try and put out a raging forest fire. Players move to burning tiles and roll dice trying to match the combination shown on the burning tile. The more symbols you match, the better you will do, but fail to match a symbol on a roll and the fire gets worse. You can use vehicles to help your battle, but at the end of each turn the fire spreads by drawing a Fire card. Players win if they put out all the flames and lose if 8 tiles or the Fire Camp scorches.

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Justin De Witt: I wanted to make a press-your-luck game where the consequences of failure actually mattered. I experimented with a few themes, but the idea of a fire getting out of control worked SO well it quickly became the obvious choice.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Justin De WittThere’s nothing quite like Hotshots out there right now. This is an easy to learn co-op game that will really try hard to beat you. There is also a ton of replayability between the tile arrangements and how the Fire cards play out. If you’re looking for a game that’s going to be easy to teach, challenging to win, and tense as heck, this is your jam!

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Justin De WittThose really cool plastic flames that are in the game were a huge challenge to get right. The first versions didn’t work and we had to delay the game because of it. There may have been tears involved…

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Hotshots. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Justin De Witt: Sure thing, Hotshots plays in 1 hour, for 1-4 players ages 10 and up. You can buy it NOW on our website at www.firesidegames.com/games/hotshots or Amazon at http://amzn.to/2xi0U0i.
I’ve got a joke you’ll like; What’s the worst thing about Ancient History professors? They tend to Babylon.
OOOOOH, see what I did there!?!

 

DISCLOSURE: Boardgame Babylon is not liable for damage to your sensibilities from the jokes these game designers submit. Justin ‘De Witt’ indeed!

 

More quick reads? Check out our other 5 Quick Questions posts.

 

5 Quick Questions About Kung Pao Chicken from Sunrise Tornado

5 Quick Questions About Kung Pao Chicken from Sunrise Tornado

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR. Let’s see how Ta-Te Wu, designer of Kung Pao Chicken (a game from Sunrise Tornado Game Studio that comes to Kickstarter on Jan. 2) does, shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Kung Pao Chicken?

Ta-Te Wu: Kung Pao Chicken is secret identity party game of chickens vs. foxes. If you’re a chicken, your team scores points for each chicken that is saved. If you are a fox, your team scores points for each chicken captured. The only thing is: You don’t know if you’re a chicken or a fox. Ready to Kung Pao?!?

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Ta-Te Wu: I love making games. Can’t stop and never will. If I recall correctly, I made Kung Pao Chicken because I wanted to make a game with chicken before the Year of the Chicken, based on the Chinese Zodiac. Just days after I made the first prototype, I went to Las Vegas and playtested with Aki, my college roommate, and his friends. We played it over and over and had a lot of fun. Yet, I spent a whole year to finish the game, making sure it is as good as it should be.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Ta-Te Wu: Kung Pao Chicken is a quick filler and there is always a demand for this type of game. The game is easy to teach and fun to play. KPC has a few fun deduction mechanics and every game feels different based on the card distribution. I think the best part of the game is probably the phase where you need to guess who you are. It makes most people laugh. You will know what I mean when you play the game 🙂

Kung Pao Chicken Game
Designers John Clair (Downfall, Mystic Vale), Brad Brooks (Rise of Tribes, Letter Tycoon) and a friend Kung Paoing it up. Photo courtesy Ta-Te Wu.

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Ta-Te Wu: Hmmm…that I am working on a two-player expansion and an edition that can be played with 20 people?

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Kung Pao Chicken. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Ta-Te Wu: Kung Pao Chicken is a 3 to 5 player game and plays in 15 minutes. It will be on Kickstarter on Jan 2nd, 2018. Finally, no animals were harmed in the making of Kung Pao Chicken.Kung Pao Chicken Game

 

DISCLOSURE: Boardgame Babylon is not liable for damage to your sensibilities from the jokes these game designers submit.

5 Quick Questions About Guild Masters

5 Quick Questions About Guild Masters

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for designers. We promise no TL;DR. Let’s see how Matt Austin, designer of Guild Masters (a game that just launched on Kickstarter) does, shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for Guild Masters?

Matt Austin: Guild Masters is a fantasy crafting board game where you play a guild leader competing to establish the most prestigious guild. You’ll gather resources to supply your guild, craft powerful items to send heroes on quests, recruit new workers with special abilities, and expand your guild by building new rooms. At the end of the game, the King arrives to judge all the guilds and the player with the highest prestige is the winner.

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Matt Austin: I love fantasy RPG and adventure videogames, so I’ve always wanted to make a board game in that setting. The initial inspiration for Guild Masters actually came from a cute mobile game called Puzzle Forge, where you play as a blacksmith forging weapons for different people in town. I took that idea and ran with the theme, building a board game from that perspective. I love the twist on the genre, having you play as a guild leader overseeing everything instead of the hero going on the quests.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Matt Austin: Gamers come in all different flavors, and it can be challenging to find a game that fits everyone’s preferences. My goal with Guild Masters was to design a game that was very accessible and easy to learn, but also one that has tons of depth and replayability for dedicated gamers. Playtesters have been really happy with the result, picking up the game quickly but also wanting to play again and again to master the variety of strategies. I think Guild Masters is a great fit for anyone who wants a rich strategy game that is also tightly designed and full of theme.

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Matt Austin: I can neither confirm nor deny whether I’ve secretly been working on and testing rules for 6 players and for solo play. I would never tell you about that.

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Guild Masters. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interviewette?

Guild Masters is a 2-5 player game and plays in 60-90 minutes. You can check out the Kickstarter at bit.ly/guildmasters. And I’ll end with a funny board game joke I heard recently:

What kind of games do witches like? Anything hex-based.

DISCLOSURE: Boardgame Babylon is not liable for damage to your sensibilities from the jokes these game designers submit.