PRESS RELEASE: Asmodee Digital Launches Pandemic on Xbox One and Nintendo Switch

PRESS RELEASE: Asmodee Digital Launches Pandemic on Xbox One and Nintendo Switch

Discover the Launch Trailer: As the Infection Goes Viral and Spreads Worldwide, Only Collaboration Can Stop the Pandemic!

PARIS – August 1, 2019 – Asmodee Digital, a leader in video game entertainment inspired by board games, is proud to announce the release of Pandemic on Xbox One and Nintendo Switch™. In the digital adaptation of the cooperative strategy board game, players will need to combine different roles and skills in order to save mankind from the biological horror threatening its very survival. Pandemic is available now on Xbox One and Nintendo Switch™ for $19.99.

The Launch Trailer highlights the critical stakes the players will face, mixing live action with actual gameplay to showcase Pandemic’s unique cooperative strategic game mechanics.

Already an excellent adaptation of the wonderful game, you can now play on TV…

Between the base game and its expansions, Pandemic has become a million-selling board game. Designed by Matt Leacock, the board game’s popular success was confirmed by critics, as Pandemic received the 2009 Golden Geek “Best Family Board Game” award.

The digital experience stays true to the core identity of the couch cooperative turn-based strategy game. Developed by Z-Man Games, Pandemic is a mainstream cooperative game that can be enjoyed by a wide audience, even during short game sessions, while rewarding the best decision-makers.

Acting as disease-fighting specialists, players engage in a race against time to contain four epidemics threatening to wipe out different regions on the globe. Players can choose one of the seven specialist roles: contingency planner, dispatcher, medic, scientist, researcher, operations expert, or quarantine specialist. Each role features unique abilities that players will need to combine as efficiently as possible in order to overcome the 5 difficulty levels.

Pandemic differs from a lot of games as it rewards cooperation rather than competition. Players must join their efforts, using their complementary skill sets, in order to discover the cures before it’s too late for mankind.

The game can be experienced as a single player, by managing multiple characters, or with friends, using local cooperative multiplayer. The latter allows up to 5 players to play together using the couch cooperative mode for both Xbox One and Nintendo Switch™.

In late September, players will be able to activate a free DLC on Xbox One and Nintendo Switch™:

  • On the Brink – Virulent Strain will spread a new kind of virus into the world.
  • On the Brink – Roles & Events will offer players new roles add new events to help save mankind.

In October, Pandemic will be featured in the growing library of great games available through Xbox Game Pass, along with other acclaimed Asmodee Digital titles, including The Lord of the Rings: Adventure Card Game and Munchkin.

The Pandemic Launch Trailer is available here.

Pandemic is available now on Xbox One and Nintendo Switch™ for $19.99.

For more information about the game, feel free to visit:

https://www.asmodee-digital.com/en/pandemic/

PRESS RELEASE: Eggertspiele Announces Era: Medieval Age, a Roll & Build game!

PRESS RELEASE: Eggertspiele Announces Era: Medieval Age, a Roll & Build game!

Eggertspiele is excited to announce its next great game, Era: Medieval Age!  Designed by the world famous designer, Matt Leacock (Pandemic series, Roll Through the Ages) and illustrated by Chris Quilliams (Coimbra, Azul), Era: Medieval Age serves as a spiritual successor to Roll Through The Ages.  While Roll Through The Ages was a pioneer for Roll & Write genre, Era will serve as a pioneer for Roll & Build!

Era

In Era, your dice represent different classes of medieval society as players attempt to build the most prosperous city.  The “Build” comes into play as players actually build their cities on their boards – you will use beautifully modeled three-dimensional components, such as walls, keeps, farms, and other structures.  By the end of the game, each player will have designed their own unique city.  Get your cameras out for this one, you’ll definitely be sharing pics with your friends!  However, the most exciting news is that Era: Medieval Age serves as the first in a series of collaborative Roll & Build games between Matt Leacock and Eggertspiele!

Era: Medieval Age was designed for lords and ladies, aged 12 and older.  While building a domain often took several generations, a game of Era typically takes about 45 minutes.  Era is expected to debut at GenCon 2019 and should in retailers shortly after!

5 Quick Questions About Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 from Matt Leacock

5 Quick Questions About Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 from Matt Leacock

Editor’s Note: As a kind of content geek, I try new formats. So, here’s a new interviewette for tabletop designers. We promise no TL;DR.

Let’s see how Matt Leacock, one of the designers of the red-hot Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 does, shall we?

BGB: Attention is money, my friend. What is the elevator pitch for the Pandemic Legacy: Season 2?

Matt Leacock: Pandemic Legacy: Season 2 continues the story of Pandemic Legacy: Season 1. Set 71 years in the future, it lets you embark on an epic adventure to bring humanity back from the brink of extinction. It features new mechanisms and surprises, but the rhythms of the game will be familiar to those who enjoyed the first season.

BGB: Making games is hard work, so you best have a great reason for making this thing. What inspired this game?

Matt Leacock: When as Z-man put “Season 1” on the first game, Rob and I looked at each other and realized that there might be more of them. And after the Season 1 shot up the charts, it was clear that players wanted more, too.

BGB: There are too many games out there. What hole in my game collection does this fill?

Matt Leacock: This game continues the everything you loved about the first season, in fresh new ways. It’s a great way to bond with a few other players as you navigate your away through a high stakes story.

Pandemic Legacy: Season 2

BGB: This is Boardgame Babylon, so out with your dirty secrets. What DON’T you want to tell me about this game?

Matt Leacock: This game gives you more freedom to choose your own path than Season 1 – it’s less on rails. For example, right from the first game in January, you’ll need to decide which direction you’d like to explore in the world. You can be your own worst enemy however, if you don’t consider the bigger picture when deciding what your group should do. The game forgives losses along the way, but there is a wider “cone of possibilities” that you’ll need to navigate. That can mean that better players may have an easier time while others may struggle a bit more than they did in the first season.

BGB: Thanks for telling us a bit about Pandemic Legacy, Season 2. Let’s wrap up with the key specifics (play time, number of players, and the link to the game) and also, since I think you can tell a lot about a person by understanding their sense of humor, what’s a good joke to close this interview?

Matt Leacock: 60 minutes per game for an average of 16–18 games per campaign. (12–24 games are possible.)
2-4 players. New players can join or drop over the course of the campaign. (Solo play is also possible if one player plays multiple characters.)
More from Z-man: https://www.zmangames.com/en/products/pandemic-legacy-season-2/
BGG: https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/221107/pandemic-legacy-season-2

BGB JOKE TIME

“What time does Sean Connery get to Wimbledon?”

“Tennish”

That’s all I’ve got for today.

Session Review: Knit Wit by Matt Leacock

Session Review: Knit Wit by Matt Leacock

Most modern gamers love beautiful components. Maybe it’s a reaction to our excessive screentime these days, where we travel in magical, wondrous worlds that we can see and hear but cannot touch. For me, that’s a lot of the appeal of board games. Having physical pieces to handle while looking at the faces of friends and family. We’re even funding crazy-gorgeous deluxe versions of games (hoping they arrive SOMEDAY). So, it was just a tiny bit surprised when someone at our table commented that Knit Wit, the new game from Matt Leacock, was ‘really overproduced.’

Sure, microgames have shown us that exceptional game experiences can come in small packages. Heck, there are some really cool print and IMG_7906play games. That doesn’t mean fillers cannot come in big ones. Knit Wit is indeed a short yet enjoyable game that comes in a big box that might make some players think it could have been produced for a lower price. Okay, maybe that’s true. We’ve already seen Flick ‘Em Up downgraded to make it more affordable. I say that’s a bummer but people are usually on a budget so is Knit Wit worth your $35 (MSRP)?

Knit Wit is one of those word games that feels immediate both because it is familiar and good. The elevator pitch is “Scattergories with Venn Diagrams.” Yeah, that’s a solid description I wish I’d used initially when explaining it rather than talking about how to place spools. Players essentially set up a bunch of spools, clothespins, and strings in patterns on a table. The clothespins get small cards with words added to them. Then, based on where the spools get placed, everyone gets a Scattergories list going. The word for each spool needs to take into account the strings that surround it. Thus, Spool Number 5 (there are 8) might be inside the string with a clothespin that has the word “Bad” as well as the one that says “Boring.” So, players would write a word or brief phrase that is both “Bad” and “Boring” (i.e., Superman vs. Batman or post-Nirvana 90’s Rock or maybe Krysten Ritter’s performance in Jessica Jones).

Speed matters, too. Those who fill out their answers quicker (or fill out as many as they know) can stop writing and grab a bonus button, of which there are four, with descending values (simply, elegantly denoted by the number of holes on the buttons). Players then share their answers, with any matches (same answer for a spool) being lost. Like Scattergories, it helps to go a little obscure. But don’t push it; players can challenge your questionable answers and put them to a vote. Then, you total up scored answers with bonuses and it’s over. Until you immediately play it a second time. This is even encouraged by the double-sided score pages, which are on black paper with white pencils to write on them. Love it.IMG_7925

 

Final Word

Knit Wit is definitely a good time and was liked by all of our casual gamer friends. More serious word nerds may wish for there to be something more but I say that it’s a pleasant game for all and a likely closer for us in the future.

So what about those components? Well, they’re lovely. The spools are sturdy and pleasing to hold. Buttons, clothespins and other components, especially the unexpectedly rigid (in a good way) word cards are all thematic and fun to hold, even if you wonder whether Z-Man Games hit a JoAnn Fabrics closing sale or something. The box itself is pretty nice, although the slip cover is the only serious misfire. The box closes fine but the slip cover (which, seriously, gamers can’t throw away) is just a pain to put back on. Didn’t they learn to stop with the box innovations after the Lords of Waterdeep fiasco?

In the end, I’m glad to own Knit Wit but I also think that it’s $35 price tag might prevent some sales. If the Z-less Man (had to be said) had found a way to produce the game for $20 in the way that Codenames did, they’d have a mass-market possibility. As it is, it’s a welcome addition to my collection and gamers who love pretty word games that play quickly will enjoy it. Fans of Matt’s other games should know from the packaging that they’re not getting another world-on-fire cooperative game and may indeed be happily surprised to see him turn out a cool little word game like this one.

Boardgame Babylon Rating

BIN (Buy It Now)   PIN (Play It Now)   TIF (Try It First)   NMT (Not My Thing)