2017: Boardgame Babylon’s My Year with Books, Part 3

And, here is 2017: My Year With Books, Part 3. This is continuing my list of books I read in 2017 and some light commentary. I read a lot of fiction, marketing, data, and design books – with the smattering of books on music and musicians, theme parks, and various obscure concepts. To get the full story on this series of articles, please see my previous posts 2017: My Year With Books, Part 1 and 2017: My Year With Books, Part 2.

2017: My Year with Books, Part 3

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F_ck by Mark Manson – Non-Fiction – New Read
Another one from that list of gifted books on Product Hunt, I immediately realized I didn’t need this book because I was living so many of its principles. Manson’s manifesto is pretty simple: Stop expecting the world owes you things, work hard, and make real contributions rather than fussing and moaning about things. This book immediately felt like the antidote for the stereotypical Millennial. It knocks self-obsessed, narcissistic people onto their duffs, tells them to shape up and start taking part in the world without worrying so much about nonsense. I immediately wanted to give it to a few people I know, but it would likely offend them just the same. A great gift from the self-absorbed people you meet.

2017: My Year with Books, Part 3

Catching the Big Fish: Meditation, Consciousness, and Creativity by David Lynch – Non-Fiction – New Read
A slim volume of seemingly random observations, Lynch’s comments are pragmatic and sometimes odd, like his work. I enjoyed the quick read through but nothing really stuck with me as instructive in life.

2017: My Year with Books, Part 3

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg – Non-Fiction – New Read
How we develop habits and the ability to harness the power of them is the subject of Duhigg’s work. I found elements useful for design as well as our psychometric analysis of social speech that we do as part my company’s technology, so this one was highly useful. I enjoyed the book immensely and will highlight some material in particular for use. Seeking his other books now because this one was a definite winner.

2017: My Year with Books, Part 3

Sprint: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days by Jake Knapp – Non-fiction – Re-read
Read this first when it came out but wanted to apply more principles of it to our work, so I read it again. The clear methods for attacking design and production of software – really, modern products in general – and it is like a textbook for us when building something completely new.

2017: My Year with Books, Part 3
RIP Harlan Ellison

Ellison Wonderland by Harlan Ellison – Fiction – Re-read
Harlan is one of my favorite writers, despite him personally trying to convince my father to throw me out of the house when I was nineteen (yes, I’ll tell that story fully one day). Ellison Wonderland is a great set of stories and I wanted to recommend it to Alaric. In downloading it on Overdrive, I found it contained new introductions and since Harlan’s non-fiction musings are often as enjoyable as his fiction, I decided to give it a listen. What a delight to hear these stories from Harlan’s own mouth and realize most hadn’t aged much. Still one of my favorite collections of sci-fi; funny, poignant and interesting works. Harlan never really did novels, but he has the short story down cold. Recommended!

2017: My Year with Books, Part 3

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan – Fiction – New Read
Delightful romp for bibliophiles and startup kids alike, the book is a finely spiced stew with plenty of geeky moments and tech knowledge to keep them engaged. While I won’t reveal the central mystery, Sloan has done a nice job of building a mystery with some useful points and a healthy amount of just enjoyable text. A light, but compulsive read.

Rework by Jason Fried – Non-Fiction – New Read
Another good book on running a successful business and one that I immediately acquired after an electronic read. Many common-sense notions of how to get work done quickly and I appreciated the frank attitude about how much you can do on a regular basis without having to get this or that before you can start. Just start. A reasonable textbook for our business that was helpful for some of our process improvement.

Set the Boy Free by Johnny Marr – Non-Fiction – New Read
Morrissey’s autobiography has been on my shelf for a bit and aftersuddenly reading this on a whim, I will get to it in 2018. Marr’s book is a light read that tells his version of everything and in a rather pleasant light. Little is discussed about the conflicts that the two had, with Marr focusing instead on a travelogue of his career before, during and after the Smiths with the light air of an only casually-interested biographer. Still a pleasant read, but I would have liked to hear it warts-and-all. As it is, Set the Boy Free is fine for big Smiths, Electronic or Marr fans but probably not a lot of others.

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nicholas Nassim Taleb – Non-Fiction – New Read
Another book from that list of ‘Most Gifted Books’, Taleb’s book has a great message – that we are tested by the tough things in life that make us stronger – and then goes on to use examples that I flatly didn’t think supported his claim. Not every aspect of life can work with this principle but Taleb seems to think, as the proverb suggests, that everything looks like a nail. Yet, quite a bit later I see how how Taleb’s overall thesis remains strong – those who learn to take change as a natural evolution that can be turned a positive way (rather than resisting it and fighting to keep things as per the status quo) are ready for modern challenges where the world’s changing at an incredibly rapid speed. Antifragile is highly recommended for those seeking success.

Haunted Empire: Apple After Steve Jobs by Yukari Iwatani Kane – Non-fiction – New Read

Some books by journalists really benefit from the immediacy of their storytelling and detailed accounts. Not this one, however. Haunted Empire is mostly focused on the horrors of the Apple-Foxconn relationship and how it tarnished the image of both Apple and Jobs’ replacement, the uninspiring operations man they call Tim Cook. Little time is spent on the subject of how the creative aspect of Apple was affected by Jobs’ death. Notable is the fact that Cook’s crimes related to Foxconn would have happened with or without Jobs at the helm. It’s not like Steve was keeping them out of that kind of trouble. As a result, the book reads like a series of articles about Apple without much internal access. A snooze.

The Goal by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox – Non-fiction – New Read

A useful book that I read after hearing this was one of the three books that Jeff Bezos makes his execs read. It’s a great argument for Kanban and thinking through the things that actually produce work rather than old-school ideas of resource and time management. The lessons in the book are highly useful, but the format of telling it in a novel feels contrived and uninteresting. A distillation of the ideas would be better in a PowerPoint.

I guess we’ll continue with Part 4 next time because I’ve still got a few more to review briefly. Thanks for reading along and I hope you found something to add to your own list this year. I’m already deeply into my 2018 Reading Year and it’s been enormously satisfying.