Tagged: Session Review

Back to mid-week at the Gathering of Friends. If you missed the previous part, well, you can find it here. Onward…

While I was in Niagara Falls, work was infringing a bit. A work friend was dealing with some personal issues so I had to step up a bit. I was happy to do it to support him during a tough time. I love games but I love my friends even more.

Lost Cities: The Franchise

Early the next morning, I tried out Lost Cities: Roll and Write with a nice group of people, including my good friend June King and the always-welcome-at-a-table Bayard Catron. There’s really nothing new. LC:RAW follows standard rolling and writing on a pad. Much like the original game, players choose whether to invest in and even start certain all possible expeditions, because if they can’t get enough items in that column, they’ll lose points. Some elements from the SDJ-winning board game version (like boost spaces) are also present. I love Reiner Knizia’s designs, enjoy Lost Cities and I’d buy this as an app on my iPad in a heartbeat. But I’m thinking this franchise is wearing thin now and don’t need this box in my house.

A worthy third entry, Clever Cubed.

In contrast, we also played the third in roll-and-write from Wolfgang Warsch’s Clever Trilogy, amusingly but also sensibly called Clever Cubed. Like the other two in the series, you roll and figure out the intriguing ways in which the various scoring sections interact for bonus bumps, big jackpots you can build up to over the course of the game, and re-rolls for when the funky dice selection happens. If you know this series, you know that the active player selects and locks one die at a time, but loses opportunity to roll as many dice based on how high the number on the die they selected is. Warsch is so good.

I enjoy this abstract R&W more than most because you can act on other peoples’ turns. Like Wurfel Bohnanza (a favorite of mine), players can take a mini-turn, selecting one of the dice the active player did not select. Cubed is good and maybe lighter than Twice as Clever. I joked that these trilogies always seem to have a ‘more difficult’ second game. That’s true in the Mask Trilogy, Uwe Rosenberg’s Seasonal Polyomino Trilogy, and even the recent West Kingdom series.

Continuing on, I met up with another of my favorite GOF attendees, Brent Lloyd. I love playing games with him for the jokes, the thoughtful game commentary, and the sheer fun of his personality. I walked up as he was about to teach Paleo to Elizabeth Hargrave (designer of Wingspan, Mariposas, and Tussie Mussie), who was attending GOF for the first time. I’d previously met Elizabeth playing one of Matt Leacock’s prototypes and we’d made quite a team, so I didn’t mind butting in to learn Paleo. This game was near the top of my list of ‘want to play’ games.

Like most people (I expect), I became curious about Paleo after it won the KDJ 2021 over presumed favorite Lost Ruins of Arnak. Playing the game, I could see what the jury saw – this is an innovative board game with a unique feel that hangs together better than LROK. I know, I know – you probably love Arnak. Personally, I found it to be fine but overdone. A lot of elements didn’t fold into the design as cleanly as I would have liked. I also found the solo game lacking and far too administrative. I’d still play it when asked, but I didn’t need it in my personal library.

Paleo looks good on the table, too.

On the other hand, I really liked Paleo, a clever cooperative game with stories to tell. Paleo gloriously implements a card-drawing mechanism that reminds me of the solo game Onirim and also Robinson Crusoe. The theme is prehistoric times, with players making up a tribe of people trying to survive and accomplish various goals as outlined in the scenario (cleverly created by combining various card sets).

Each round, players are given the opportunity to select one of the next three cards in their personal draw deck, which they have some insight about because of the card backs. Some backs suggest encountering goods players can gather (woods, mountains), another type is for staying at home and working crafts, while still another is a likely threat that you will probably need to be armed to address. Additional cards like Visions are also possible to obtain from certain actions.

Paleo is high on my want list.

You may not encounter every card, however, because this is a cooperative game and sometimes, the other players need your help. In fact, banding together is often the only way to take down big threats and key challenges. Why might you need help from the other players? Because requirements on the card will tell you that you can obtain or defeat what’s on the card based on the skills that your character cards have (usually with multiple options – as in Above and Below). These skills can be augmented with acquisitions you can find or craft (more on that later). However, if your current card is a threat, you may not be able to choose to ignore it and help the tribe.

When you complete a round, some cards are ‘trashed’ and others are put back into rotation when you go through the deck again. So, avoiding some threats will not mean you don’t need to deal with them. You’ve just delayed that moment.

Crafting is yet another well-implemented concept in Paleo. From a funky 3-D rack that you build, you can craft items for the current scenario, as well as a handful of standard ones like torches and tools. These can help you along the way to defeat challenges and acquire whatever key items you need to survive the round of play. What you need by the game end is designated upfront, so the tribe can plan what they truly need as they continue the adventure.

Paleo also allows you to reuse your characters from scenario to scenario. If you happen to die, the game gives you a new tribe member to play so there is danger and loss, but not player elimination. Between the smart design, the varied stories that conjure up memories to be told over at future game tables, and the thoughtful approach to cooperation, I call Paleo a winner that I want in my collection.

After a couple of scenarios of Paleo, we dove into a game of Krass Kariert. The game has been newly titled (for English speakers) Dealt! This new version was in our gift bags; a smart move for Amigo because this ladder-climbing game was so popular at the last GOF that we probably all bought copies. I know I did. These copies will likely be given to friends with a recommendation. I donated my copy to the Strategicon library to spread the word.

The word deserves to be spread, too. Dealt! is a quick-playing card game that has the lovely feel of Tichu without the mannered play, team element, and big swings of card luck. Of course I’ve had issues with Tichu for many years for the simple reason that before I ever learned the game, I had played thousands of hands of Daihimi and probably at least 500 hands of Gang of Four. Both of those experiences make it difficult for me to remember exactly what I need to do in Tichu and therefore I’m not much of a partner.

X marks the wild card.

Dealt feels different enough from those games and I love it. Players are each dealt a hand of cards they may not rearrange (like Bohnanza) and two face-up cards. The cards are numbered from 1 to 13, plus a few special cards. Play proceeds by someone leading either a single card, a run of two or three cards, or multiples (pairs, trips). The next player must play something higher, either in rank or configuration and it’s a once-around play. If it comes to your turn and you cannot advance the trick, you have two choices. Either take one of your face up cards into your hand – placing it wherever you feel is ideal – or you lose one of your three life chips and the round is over.

Mind you, the reason for keeping your cards in order is that you can only play cards together that are adjacent in-hand. This rule for runs is a bit easier, as they can be out of order (e.g., I can play 6-8-7 as a three-card run). The choice on whether to pick up a card is interesting because you can often improve your hand with these face-up cards. And, as you play, you can also improve your hand by removing cards as well.

A few special cards round out the game. The STOP card just ends a trick and the X is wild. The best of the lot shows three cards. When played, the winner of the trick draws three cards (six are set aside during setup). Later in the game, this is ideal for stopping someone about to go out. Early on, it’s helpful because you draw the cards one at a time. This gives you a chance to optimize you hand a bit, as you add them where you choose.

There is usually only one loser in Dealt – the player who runs out of chips first. However, if two players run out of chips on the same round, you can end up with a double loser situation, as we did in our game.

I played Dealt three times at GOF but the post-Paleo session was the most memorable. All of the players were worthy (Brent, Elizabeth, and Matt) but there were some adult beverages involved. Matt and Elizabeth were cautious in their imbibing of the various whiskey offerings that Brent had for us, but I was game to try everything that he had. Yes, I think my play was somewhat affected as I ended up sharing the loss with Matt. For me, Dealt/KK is a winning card game and a worthwhile addition to the hobby.

I don’t think there’s a man, woman, or child alive who doesn’t enjoy a lovely beverage.

Okay, that’s enough for today. Part 3 will include discussion of Android, another cool prototype I played, plus a few more games that I knew and played primarily for the great company at the table.

My reports on attending Alan Moon’s invitational tabletop event, the Gathering of Friends, have been as inconsistent as my old podcast schedule. When an event happens, some content may happen…or maybe not. This year, however, I am inclined to write about the experience for both my own recollection of the healing, heavenly week I enjoyed but also to allow for some to live vicariously through these words if they could not attend this or another convention held this year for whatever reason.

Eb airborne
Airborne and masked

This was, if I understand correctly, the first time GOF was rescheduled to this time of year, due to COVID. Safety protocols were in place and while I was nervous about the travel from LA to Niagara Falls, I was confident about my safety during my time there, thanks to Alan’s firm commitment to making sure everyone would be okay. Everyone had to be vaccinated, as they well should, and ensure they had no symptoms beforehand. I’m glad to preemptively report that it would appears there were no infections from the event, as the community has been reporting negative tests consistently, although more on that later.

On to the games. I arrived later than expected, early Tuesday morning, due to last minute changes in schedule, but that still gave me a full week to enjoy the convention. While attendance was down from its usual highs (around 400?), the game room was STOCKED with board games, including prototypes from many of the designers who made the con and lots of the newest new games from here and across the pond. Sadly, that was just due to imports and not because we had the usual mix of European visitors. Tough EU restrictions meant that so many of our favorite Europeans designers, gamers, and game industry pros couldn’t make it and that even affected the plans of many of my favorite Canadians. This was a huge void but I focused on appreciating who we did have because the room was still full of so many excellent people.

Attack on Titan. Now I need to go see the anime series. Sigh.

Attacking Titans and Plunder Pirates

After the red eye flight and a tiny bit of work, my first board game of the convention was Attack on Titan, the deckbuilding anime-themed game from Cryptozoic and Matt Hyra. I had mixed the game up with another one based on the same IP, Attack on Titan: The Last Stand from Antoine Bauza, but I was still happy to play because I was recruited by Sheila and James Davis, purported to be the owners of the largest game collection in the US, who were both familiar with the anime series the game hangs its theme on. I’ve only seen it briefly; I’m the only non-anime person in the house, but the deckbuilding mechanisms were familiar. There are some ideas I haven’t seen in deckbuilders, including the opportunity to return standard cards back for an in-turn boost.

Otherwise, it’s a cooperative game with players taking on the roles of characters from the series to defend five gates against the onslaught of titans and bad stuff coming out of a villains deck. Interspersed amongst the garden-variety titans turning out after each round to attack the five walls we were guarding, were four mega-titans (or some such) that had to be defeated first in hit points before a massive killing blow that had to be delivered in one go. This last concept with the killing blow is another good innovation for this sub-genre that I expect to see show up elsewhere. Chatting with the Davis’ is always fun, too, although I really got to talk to them more at the final Sunday dinner, where Shiela shared her admiration for the games of Ta-Te Wu, my good buddy. Always lovely to hear and share back with my friend.

After this first game, I spotted Ken Hill from Rio Grande Games just in time to join play of a prototype from Gregory Daigle. One of the great joys of the Gathering, second only to the wonderful people, is the chance to try early prototypes from top designers. I’ve played with Greg at past shows and I do love his excellent Hans Im Gluck title Hawaii (not just for the lovely theme). In this case, his new Powder and Plunder prototype brought his mix of euro mechanisms to a pirate-themed experience. The game seems pretty well along and was a good experience, particularly the innovative deck manipulation and intriguing options built into a modular board. I also appreciated the lack of forced player-vs-player interactions, which seem inevitable for so many pirate games. Looking forward to seeing the final product in the days ahead.

Art Decko on Boardgame Arena

Art Decko: The New Promenade

Following that, I enjoyed chatting with Greg, Ken and his fellow RGGer, Scott Tepper. In addition to sharing dog stories, Ken showed me the new version of Ta-Te Wu’s Promenade, which RGG will be publishing as Art Decko (yes, it’s an art-collecting, deck-building game with a punny title).

So, I broke out Art Decko with a couple of newbies and took the new version for a spin. The artwork in the new version is actually quite enjoyable and this clever take on deck building games shined yet again. AD has you buying art with your standard five cards per turn but Ta-Te’s design amps up the trashing and use of cards in intriguing ways. Instead of VP cards being dead in your hand, they are currency and assets you can put into museums for VPs based on the requirements for each collection.

Furthermore, there are additional bonuses that affect your collection as a whole or for the individual pieces of art being displayed (kind of a ‘point side-salad’, if you will). This allows you to slim down your deck, which is also possible by using some currency cards for their trash ability, allowing you more buying power for the turn at the cost of your card long-term.

Add to that variable market pricing and I find Art Decko to be one of the most satisfying of Ta-Te’s designs and a real keeper. The original version, Promenade, for which I brought a prototype to the last Gathering in 2019, must have been played with some frequency because I saw copies of the limited edition version in a lot of game piles at the event. I happily reported this to Ta-Te, who was delighted.

Daybreak Prototype: Not final product. Approved for use here.

Daybreak: Just Award the Kennerspiel Now

Later in the day, I ran into Matt Leacock, designer of Pandemic, and one of my favorite game designers. He’s also from California, so he’s attended our Strategicon conventions a few times to play test and at our invitation as a Guest of Honor. As one of the earliest fans and champions of Pandemic, I’ve been watching his output closely for years. While I’m forbidden from speaking any more about the prototype I played, I’m happy to say that he’s continuing to advance the world of cooperative games with new elements and themes. During the event, I also played two other prototypes of his, including a dexterity game that had the audience hooting and hollering with joy and excitement, and Daybreak, his take on fighting climate change.

Daybreak has plenty of information online but I’ll talk about a bit more because I really liked the game. I won’t go into the mechanisms but suffice it to say that you can clearly see in this design how Matt’s artistry has continued to evolve. While you can call it Pandemic’s bigger, more detailed brother, that’s selling short the innovation of the systems Matt has developed. Yes, it’s a cooperative game and the players are working against a crisis of global proportion. Of course, the game itself is a paper machine that kind of ‘gets its turn’. But the similarities end there, as players are asked to make more detailed decisions for the countries they are managing than running a medic or scientist around the global squashing cubes and collecting cards.

That’s not to dismiss the approachable and compelling Pandemic (which I still consider one of the greatest board games around). Rather, it’s to point out that Daybreak feels more like a gamer’s experience, with nuance that a lesser designer would make feel like ‘chrome’ on a design. Matt’s light touch instead implements intriguing decisions elegantly into hand management of various categories, allowing players to make calls about working locally vs. globally, replacing old and dirty sources of energy vs. simply adding new green solutions to meet increasing demand, or even managing the short-term thinking outrage from within your country vs. doing what is right for the future. The game is detailed and plays smoothly – no small feat.

I think Daybreak will come out and wow audiences and probably earn Matt and his co-designer a KDJ for their efforts. I was not alone in my assessment. In addition to so many others expressing their admiration for the game (and the frequent requests to break it out), I played the game with Legacy concept originator Rob Daviau and he expressed that he was ‘almost annoyed at how good the game is.” What better compliment could a designer get from another one?

Okay, that’s enough for Part 1. More to come in part two and beyond…

REVIEW: Arkham Ritual casts a light spell of Cthulhu

Arkham Ritual is a solid deduction game from NinjaStar Games that has the feel of many recent microgames, but with some new concepts as well. Designer Hiroki Kasawa looks to the time-honored Cthulhu Mythos of H.P. Lovecraft for the setting of this quick-playing title but the star is really the twisty game play.

This Ninja Star game is for 3 – 7 players, but you really want at least 5 to see the game at its best (even the publisher agrees with this assessment). Thematically, players are part of a mysterious ritual, perhaps trying to sort it out or maybe just deciding to give this being evil thing a go (seems like more . The ritual involves a lot of magic artifacts of varying alignments and some special cards that you will play or switch out. This process may change your intentions as you try to survive the ritual without going insane. This is harder because you do not know what you are holding at any one time.

Calling back to the concept of Blind Man’s Bluff poker or even the euro-style version, Powwow, players hold one card at a time and make it visible to everyone else, but it is not known to them. With the knowledge of other players’ cards, the idea of the game is to sort out if you need to discard your own to avoid losing sanity in the current turn.

Arkham Ritual

The deck of cards is just a bit larger than the Love Letter deck that has become a standard number for microgames. At 22 cards, it is manageable to deduce what is in play and what might be hidden in your own hand. The card mix included events and artifacts of both blue and red colors (good and bad, respectively), and cards featuring Lovecraftian Great Old Ones (yes, those are bad). Each turn, players decide to either keep an unseen card and discard their current one or take a peek at it and pass it to another player. The discard goes to the tableau in the center of the table, which helps everyone figure out what remains and what they might holding. If you pass it, it might go around the table until no one else can pass it, when it becomes that last player’s hand card.

Are You Cursed?

When the round ends from a specific card play or running through the deck, Red cursed cards will cost you sanity if you have one in-hand. Additionally, each artifact has a duplicate in the non-cursed (blue) world, so if you have that one when the other is in play, you also lose some sanity. Sanity is tracked in brain tokens, of which there are plenty.

Arkham Ritual

Keep your brains on-hand.

There are some special cards, too, including a Cultist that will switch which color cards are cursed, gates that bring in special problems with the Old Ones and the Elder Sign that ends the round earlier. The Cthulhu card is an automatic win if someone else has one of the Gate cards, too, so if you see this combo, it is best to get them out of those players’ hands. In this way, players need to get a bit used to the cards to do well. With that short play time, it’s easy to play again immediately.

Arkham Ritual is an enjoyable game with a large group and it is perfect for the Halloween season with its dark theme. Yet, the theme is implemented pretty lightly. While deeply thematic games like Arkham Horror or A Study in Emerald give you the true feel of Lovecraftian horror, this is a party game so you can’t get into the lore too much. That’s probably best for some players who might be less enthusiastic about Nyarlathotep and Yog-Sothoth.

How’s That Theme?

In a recent podcast episode, I spoke with the fellows who run the On Boardgames show about Lovecraft-themed games. Lovecraft is one of the authors that dominated my young life after my Uncle Bill (recently departed and deeply missed) gave me some of his books. The nightmarish world of cosmic horror that Lovecraft embodied was fascinating to me, someone who is more likely to enjoy the Twilight Zone than gory slasher films. So, I was glad to talk about my favorites. Even though I’d received (full disclosure) a copy of Arkham Ritual ahead of time, I forgot to mention it because the theme is present, but it isn’t the part of the game that makes it most compelling. While I would not drop it into the category of pointless Cthulhu-themed games like Reiner Knizia’s Cthulhu Rising or Unspeakable Words, I’d certainly say Arkham Ritual is more fun because of the deduction elements than any cosmic horror theming.

Arkham Ritual is available now from Amazon or directly from Ninja Star Games.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Arkham Ritual

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (P)lay It Now TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: Publisher Ninja Star Games provided a copy for independent review.

SESSION REVIEW: Paperback App from Tim Fowers

Paperback, the smash-hit game from designer Tim Fowers (of Burgle Brothers and Wok Star fame), has come to mobile devices and I couldn’t be more delighted. Thematically, Paperback has players trying to finish a pulpy paperback novel by constructing words throughout the game, which is pleasantly brought to life with the amusing artwork and quick game play.

Paperback the original board game is typically described as the baby of Scrabble and Dominion, which is apt. Players get to make words from a hand of letter cards drawn each turn in deck-builder style. Each letter has a value and whatever you construct for the turn gives you money to buy new (often better, higher value) letters, some of which have special powers. You can also buy victory point cards if you have enough money. Despite being the key to winning, they clog up your deck with wild cards that have no buying power. There are also special powers on certain letter cards that do cool things like double word scores, draw extra cards and other nice things. There’s a way to get points for longer words, too. It’s a load of fun for wordsmiths and casual players alike.

You want a detailed description of play? This guy wrote it out (although he added an ‘l’ to Tim’s surname, which I expect isn’t uncommon). You can also watch this video. You didn’t think I was going to explain it rule-by-rule did you? Come on. Where are you?

What I Love About The Paperback App

I need to disclose something. I’m a recovering iOS deckbuilding addict. I’ve played SO many games of Ascension and Dominion on my iPhone that even my careful documentation of plays ceased to have Paperbackmeaning. The quick play of these games against a single AI player is almost too compelling. Playing them swallowed all my little bits of time on my device and I finally had to stop so I could read books and get back to completing mini-workflows in those odd moments. But Paperback has me back off the wagon and loving it.

Normal Paperback as a board game has the same challenge that word nerds face when trying to find opponents for Scrabble. Simply put, if you have an excellent vocabulary, you just have a natural advantage. Like being tall in basketball, it isn’t everything but it sure helps.

While modern players have Qwirkle as a good alternative that levels the playing field with color/shape combos instead, those of us who just love words still yearn for the opportunity to build them from a jumble of letters. With the Paperback app, I can indulge this passion with the AI player when no one else is available. Furthermore, the game has helpful setting options to allow players to adjust the length of their games. I’ve often opined that some mobile app games are simply too long because I have other things to do (the opposite of how I feel when I’m at a table with excellent people). I welcome Paperback giving the player control over the length of their experience.

Furthermore, Paperback rides on the Loom Game Engine and it works really well. Animation and game speed are all excellent. Fowers isn’t just a brilliant board game designer – he has a background in technology so I’d expect nothing different from his apps.

What I Didn’t Like

A prompt update eliminated one of my pet peeves – confirmation windows – ugh! Just because that was considered good coding in CS classes, it’s a nightmare by modern UX standards…okay, rant over. However, Paperback still makes me listen to its theme music instead of letting me bring in my own playlist. As a passionate music-lover who carefully curates what goes into my ears, this is a problem. The theme music is pleasant and appropriate but it isn’t going to make me not want Hope Sandoval of Mazzy Star to serenade me while I play my word nerd games. That sultry voice just gets the little gray cells going. Full rules are now available, too – not just a video link. Some of us still read, including those who want a Paperback app! I feel sure Tim is addressing those issues in future releases.

The Final Word on Paperback for iOS

Paperback is a well-implemented version of a game that is ideally suited for the mobile device play. I love it and certainly recommend you give is a download. I’m sure it is available for Android somewhere, wherever those things happen.

GET PAPERBACK ON IOS NOW

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Paperback for iOS

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (P)lay It Now TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: An app code was provided for review by the publisher.

Don’t you hate it when a new edition of your favorite game comes out and the old one might as well go in the trash bin? Sushi Go Party will not do that to you. Fans will love the expanded version and they can easily recycle their previous copy by handing it to a friend as a great introduction to modern board games. That is, until the friend loves it so much that they upgrade to Sushi Go Party and pass the basic game on, too. The new version is that welcome and good.

Sushi Go For Beginners (skip this section, experts)

If you don’t know the original Sushi Go, where have you been? This inexpensive crowd-pleaser has enjoyably light Sushi Go Partygame play (plays in 20-30 minutes) and charming artwork sure to dazzle young and new-to-modern-game players. The game works incredibly well for that set, while serious gamers often like it as a filler.

Play is simple but interesting: players get a hand of cards, selecting and revealing one at a time, and then passing the hand to the left (a ‘pick and pass’ mechanism, as it is sometimes called). This is done until all cards are gone, which triggers scoring for the round. Points are awarded for sets that are collected and scored in unique ways for different cards (e.g., majority, multipliers, pairs, etc.) The game plays over three rounds, with building scores and a final bonus for dessert cards collected over the course of the game. The original game is enormous fun and so worth the cost of this small tin chock full of fun. But the new edition is even better.

Sushi Go Party Expands The Menu

Yes, it’s still Sushi Go but bringing the party means two key changes: more players and more variety. The new expanded version offers both in spades. Sushi Go Party plays up to eight – a very welcome feature – and combines the original game with the Dominion concept. Designer Phil Walker-Harding (whose SDJ-nominated Imhotep is all the rage right now) gives buyers of the big new tin a host of new cards in sets that you can mix and match for varied play.

In an inspired thematic choice, Walker-Harding has added ‘menus’ of card sets to play. Card types are now categorized as Rolls, Appetizers, Specials, and Desserts. Your custom bento box of card selection options (you can use a pre-made ones or build your own) are clearly shown with cardboard markers that sit in the center of the new score track. Hurray to that addition as well. No more score-keeping elsewhere on paper or scoring apps round to round.

Card and menu selections from each type can adjust the feel of the game for more interaction or to appeal to larger player counts. For example, there’s now a Spoon card that allows players to request a card from other player hands. There are also risky propositions with Eel and Tofu cards, which require players to have specific numbers of cards or earn a penalty. Additional desserts have been added and a distribution tweak that has more of these end-of-the-game cards rolling in each round makes these post-meal bonuses work better.

Sushi Go Party

The Final Word on Sushi Go Party

Like Sushi Go, Sushi Go Party plays quickly and it doesn’t take any longer to play with eight than it does with the original five player limit. In fact, the new edition even has improved rules to play the game well with only two players. My wife and I tried the new two-player version and it worked quite well. While it isn’t a game that I’d expect to transition so well (even the wondrous 7 Wonders is MUCH better as 7 Wonders: Duel than in in the two-player variant of the original), Walker-Harding has come up with a good way to handle things when you want Sushi For Two.

Sushi Go Party is an ideal upgrade to the original and an instant buy for fans of the game. Everyone who plays it with us says they want to buy it. The game is now on our must-include board game list for travel and big game parties. The US edition is out from Gamewright and you can see previews of many of the new cards on the designer’s Twitter feed.

Boardgame Babylon Rating for Sushi Go Party

BIN (Buy It Now) PIN (Play It Now) TIF (Try It First) NMT (Not My Thing)

Disclosure: Copy provided by the publisher for independent review.